geodesic dome

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Related to Buckminster Fuller dome: geodesic dome

geodesic dome

n
(Architecture) a light structural framework arranged as a set of polygons in the form of a shell and covered with sheeting made of plastic, plywood, metal, etc; developed by Buckminster Fuller
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ge′odes′ic dome′


n.
a light domelike structure developed by R. Buckminster Fuller, consisting of a framework of straight members, usu. in tension, typically having the form of a projection upon a sphere of a grid of triangular or polygonal faces.
[1955–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ge·o·des·ic dome

(jē′ə-dĕs′ĭk, jē′ə-dē′sĭk)
A structure having the shape of a dome or partial sphere but made of flat triangular pieces that fit rigidly together.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geodesic dome - a lightweight dome constructed of interlocking polygons; invented by R. Buckminster Fuller
dome - a hemispherical roof
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

geodesic dome

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Buckminster Fuller Dome Home, located at Cherry Street and Forest Avenue.
"The Garden Party," Kluver's written account of the event, opens by noting that Tinguely built his suicidal contraption inside the Buckminster Fuller dome exhibited on the grounds.
The company's expensive overheads and structural diagrams looked like a flatlander's view of a Buckminster Fuller dome. Everyone with senior responsibility for any part of the operation saw a need to defend his or her turf.