Buddhism

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Bud·dhism

 (bo͞o′dĭz′əm, bo͝od′ĭz′-)
n.
1. The teaching of Siddhartha Gautama that life is permeated with suffering caused by desire, that suffering ceases when desire ceases, and that enlightenment obtained through right conduct, wisdom, and meditation releases one from desire, suffering, and rebirth.
2. The religion represented by the many groups, especially numerous in Asia, that profess varying forms of this doctrine and that venerate Siddhartha Gautama.

Bud′dhist adj. & n.
Bud·dhis′tic adj.

Buddhism

(ˈbʊdɪzəm)
n
(Buddhism) a religious teaching propagated by the Buddha and his followers, which declares that by destroying greed, hatred, and delusion, which are the causes of all suffering, man can attain perfect enlightenment. See nirvana
ˈBuddhist n, adj

Bud•dhism

(ˈbu dɪz əm, ˈbʊd ɪz-)

n.
a religion, originated in India by Buddha and later spreading to China, Burma, Japan, Tibet, and parts of SE Asia, holding that life is full of suffering caused by desire and that the way to end this suffering is through Enlightenment that enables one to halt the endless sequence of births and deaths to which one is otherwise subject.
Bud′dhist, n., adj.
Bud•dhis′tic, adj.

Buddhism


the religion of the followers of Gautama Buddha, whose 6th-century B.C. doctrines strongly opposed the formalized, mechanical rituals of the Brahman sect in Hinduism; Buddha’s teachings offered escape from endless reincarnation, a method of spiritual attainment through correct views and actions (The Eight-Fold Path), and a spiritual goal (Nirvana): a soul free from craving, suffering, and sorrow. See also Eight-Fold Path, The.Buddhist, n. — Buddhistic, Buddhistical, adj.
the method of spiritual attainment outlined in Buddha’ s sermons on the Four Noble Truths: pain, the cause of pain, the cessation of pain, and the path that leads to this cessation, emphasizing, in the last, right view, thought, speech, action, livelihood, efïort, mindfulness, and concentration.
the predominant Chinese form of Buddhism, Foh being the Chinese name for Buddha. — Fohist, n.
Lamaism.
the earliest development of Buddhism after Buddha’s death, emphasizing doctrines and practices originally formulated by Buddha and reflected in the “School of the Elders” (Theravada) of the Pali tradition; called the “lesser vehicle,” it found followers in southern India and Ceylon. — Hinayana, n., adj.
a reformation of Buddhism in Tibet intended to bring about stricter discipline in the monasteries; the dominant sect is Gelup-Ka (The Virtuous Way), with the patron deity Chen-re-zi (the Bodhisattva of Great Mercy), who is reincarnated as the successive Dalai Lamas. Also called Gelup-Ka. — Lamaist, n.Lamaistic, adj.
a form of Mahayana Buddhism marked by its complex organization and elaborate rituals. — Lamanist, n.
the “greater vehicle” or second development of Buddhism after the death of its founder as a reaction against the orthodox and conservative ideas of the Hinayana, asserting that Gautama is one of many manifestations of one primordial Buddha and emphasizing good works illustrating the six virtues of generosity, morality, patience, vigor, concentration, and wisdom necessary to ideal Buddhism; its tenets are preserved in Sanskrit texts, later translated into Chinese and Japanese. — Mahayana, n., adj.
the principles, doctrines, and tenets that concern or are believed by all Buddhists. — Pan-Buddhist, n.
the mixed form of Buddhism practiced in Tibet, adding to ideas from both major Buddhist developments doctrines and practices from Hindu Tantric sects and the native Tibetan religion of nature worship and magic called Bönism; it combines the Hinayana concept of emancipation through self-discipline and the Mahayana concept of philosophical insight into reality for the sake of others with uniquely Tibetan magical rites and mystical meditation. — Tantrayanic, adj.
an outgrowth of Mahayana, the “meditation” sect, developed in Japan from its earlier Chinese counterpart and divided into two branches: Binzai, an austere and aristocratie monasticism emphasizing meditation on paradoxes; and Sōtō, a benevolent monasticism with great popular following, emphasizing ethical actions and charity, tenderness, benevolence, and sympathy as well as meditation on whatever occurs as illumination. — Zen, n. — Zenic, adj.

Buddhism

A religious and philosophical system founded c. 520–530 BC.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Buddhism - a religion represented by the many groups (especially in Asia) that profess various forms of the Buddhist doctrine and that venerate BuddhaBuddhism - a religion represented by the many groups (especially in Asia) that profess various forms of the Buddhist doctrine and that venerate Buddha
organized religion, religion, faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
Zen, Zen Buddhism - school of Mahayana Buddhism asserting that enlightenment can come through meditation and intuition rather than faith; China and Japan
Mahayana - a major school of Buddhism teaching social concern and universal salvation; China; Japan; Tibet; Nepal; Korea; Mongolia
Hinayana - a major school of Buddhism teaching personal salvation through one's own efforts
Tantrism - movement within Buddhism combining elements of Hinduism and paganism
Buddhist - one who follows the teachings of Buddha
2.Buddhism - the teaching of Buddha that life is permeated with suffering caused by desire, that suffering ceases when desire ceases, and that enlightenment obtained through right conduct and wisdom and meditation releases one from desire and suffering and rebirth
mandala - any of various geometric designs (usually circular) symbolizing the universe; used chiefly in Hinduism and Buddhism as an aid to meditation
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
Mahayana Buddhism, Mahayana - one of two great schools of Buddhist doctrine emphasizing a common search for universal salvation especially through faith alone; the dominant religion of China and Tibet and Japan
Theravada, Theravada Buddhism - one of two great schools of Buddhist doctrine emphasizing personal salvation through your own efforts; a conservative form of Buddhism that adheres to Pali scriptures and the non-theistic ideal of self purification to nirvana; the dominant religion of Sri Lanka (Ceylon) and Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand and Laos and Cambodia
Lamaism, Tibetan Buddhism - a Buddhist doctrine that includes elements from India that are not Buddhist and elements of preexisting shamanism
Zen, Zen Buddhism - a Buddhist doctrine that enlightenment can be attained through direct intuitive insight
Shingon - a form of Buddhism emphasizing mystical symbolism of mantras and mudras and the Buddha's ideal which is inexpressible
Tantra, Tantrism - doctrine of enlightenment as the realization of the oneness of one's self and the visible world; combines elements of Hinduism and paganism including magical and mystical elements like mantras and mudras and erotic rites; especially influential in Tibet
mantra - (Sanskrit) literally a `sacred utterance' in Vedism; one of a collection of orally transmitted poetic hymns
ahimsa - a Buddhist and Hindu and especially Jainist doctrine holding that all forms of life are sacred and urging the avoidance of violence
karma - (Hinduism and Buddhism) the effects of a person's actions that determine his destiny in his next incarnation
samsara - (Hinduism and Buddhism) the endless cycle of birth and suffering and death and rebirth
Kuan Yin, Kwan-yin - (Buddhism) a female Bodhisattva; often called goddess of mercy and considered an aspect of the Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara; identified with Japanese Kwannon
Lamaist - (Buddhism) an adherent of Lamaism
guru - a Hindu or Buddhist religious leader and spiritual teacher
nirvana, enlightenment - (Hinduism and Buddhism) the beatitude that transcends the cycle of reincarnation; characterized by the extinction of desire and suffering and individual consciousness

Buddhism

noun

Schools of Buddhism

Foism, Geluk, Hinayana, Jodo, Kagyü, Lamaism, Mahayana, Nichiren, Nyingma, Pure Land Buddhism, Rinjai, Sakya, Soka Gakkai, Soto, Tendai, Theravada, Vajrayana, Zen
Translations
البوذِيَّةالبوذِيَّه
buddhismus
buddhisme
buddhalaisuus
budizam
buddhizmus
búddhatrú
仏教
불교
budistasbudistiškasbudistųbudizmas
budisms
budism
budhizmus
buddhismbuddism
ศาสนาพุทธ
đạo Phật

Buddhism

[ˈbʊdɪzəm] Nbudismo m

Buddhism

[ˈbʊdɪzəm] nbouddhisme m

Buddhism

nBuddhismus m

Buddhism

[ˈbʊdɪzm] nbuddismo

Buddhism

(ˈbudizəm) , ((American) ˈbu:-) noun
the religion founded by Gautama or Buddha.
ˈBuddhist noun
a believer in Buddhism.
adjective
a Buddhist monk.

Buddhism

البوذِيَّة buddhismus buddhisme Buddhismus Βουδισμός budismo buddhalaisuus bouddhisme budizam Buddismo 仏教 불교 boeddhisme buddhisme buddyzm budismo буддизм buddism ศาสนาพุทธ Budizm đạo Phật 佛教
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather, they mark one's formal acceptance of the Buddhadharma and express one's hopes to live in accordance with it.
Lee was the CEO of the Buddhadharma International Trust - International Non Profit Organization for education, medical relief work and propagation of the Buddhadharma.
His writing has appeared in Free Inquiry, UUWorld, Buddhadharma, and Fantasy & Science Fiction magazines, and in the Boston Globe and Lowell Sun.
In the genre of introductory books on Buddhism, one can find scores of religious studies books that succeed to one degree or another in summarizing the buddhadharma.
The final stage in his spiritual path was what he describes as his "complete and public devotion to the Buddhadharma as a spiritual practice and way of life" which was "not made fully explicit" in his writings until the 2003 publication of Turning the Wheel: Essays on Buddhism and Writing (xv).