Bulgakov


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Bulgakov

(Russian bʊlˈɡakəf)
n
(Biography) Mikhail Afanaseyev (ʌfʌˈnasjef). 1891–1940, Soviet novelist, dramatist, and short-story writer; his novels include The Master and Margerita (1966–67)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The first chapter of Mikhail Bulgakov's Master and Margarita, which was written during the late 1920s and 1930s but only published for the first time in 1967-68, opens with a conversation about Jesus between a Soviet literary bureaucrat named Berlioz and a poet named Bezdomny, whose name translates into English as Homeless.
"Novodevichy Cemetery" begins "How strange even so the fact / that Kaganovich the mass murderer / and Mikhail Bulgakov / share after death the same narrow plot" and ends with an old lady her belongings in a plastic bag walking pensively between the gravestones "Like Virgil and Dante slowly talking with the dead." The reader does the work of putting all these together as the poem's speaker is doing.
Anton Chekhov, Sergei Prokofiev and the Stalin-era author Mikhail Bulgakov are all buried there.
We then see how two of the main figures of the religious renaissance in Russian philosophy, Pavel Florenskii and Sergii Bulgakov, developed the Trinitarian aspects of Potebnia's thought.
Most of the works of Mikhail Bulgakov, a prominent Russian playwright, novelist, and a short story writer, came to the readers over twenty years after his death.
The ramshackle idiom of Envy recalls Mikhail Bulgakov's sublime Master and Margarita, although Olesha's approach is more narrowly satirical.
One of the most gripping descriptions of the crucifixion of Jesus--one that has indelibly marked the way I see that scene in my mind's eye--comes from the creative imagination of the great Russian novelist, Mikhail Bulgakov, in his most famous work, known in English as The Master and Margarita.
Miguel de SALIS AMARAL, Dos visiones ortodoxas de la Iglesia: Bulgakov y Florovsky, Eunsa (<<Coleccion Teologica>>, 111), Pamplona 2003, 400 pp.
Sergius Theological Institute in Paris serve as a backdrop for recounting the lives and witness of Professor Paul Evdokimov, Mother Maria Skobotsova, and Fathers Sergius Bulgakov, Lev Gillet, Gregory Krug, Nicholas Afanasiev, Alexander Schmemann, John Meyendorff, and Alexander Men.