bull dyke

(redirected from Bulldyke)

bull dyke

n. Offensive Slang
Used as a disparaging term for a lesbian, especially one exhibiting stereotypically masculine behavior.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bull dyke

or

bulldyke

n
slang a lesbian who is markedly masculine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

bull dyke

n (pej sl)kesser Vater (sl)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
(In Fun Home, Bechdel reports that by age four or five, when she catches a glimpse of a "truck-driving bulldyke" making a delivery at at a diner, she has an inkling that she will turn out to be a lesbian.) In the book, this event represents the mother's earliest negative critique of her daughter's art and, implicitly, of her sexual identity.
Jeanie Kasindorf points out that "the short-haired 'bulldyke' is still many Americans' idea of what a gay woman looks like," (15) but this lesbian body-comfortable and comforting-doesn't look anything like the stereotypical lesbian body, the "mannish," makeup-less butch in boots and flannel so often associated with lesbianism.
The town's annual festival of "queer culture" hosts workshops on female sexuality and comediennes like Le DeLaria, best known for her live album Bulldyke In A Chinashop, with music provided by a "rockin' lesbo sextet".
"There's no apologizing whether you're the lipstick lesbian or the bulldyke. No one apologizes for who they are here."
Shamelessly refers to herself as "Sister Mary Bulldyke"?
All meant not just the drama queens and the bulldykes, trapped by their aversion to prescribed gender roles, or the high-octane musclebound athletes straitjacketed into a conformity every bit as strong.
In these Off-Off Broadway houses, lesbians and gay men were able to begin offering alternative representations to the standard fare of mainstream representation, what Don Shewey identifies as "frivolous fairies, psychotic bulldykes, and suicidal queens."(3) The founding of a new generation of lesbian and/or gay theatres in the early 1980s - such as San Francisco's Theatre Rhinoceros, New York City's WOW Cafe, and Seattle's Alice B.