bullroarer

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bullroarer

bull·roar·er

 (bo͝ol′rôr′ər)
n.
A small wooden slat attached to a string that makes a roaring noise when whirled.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bullroarer

(ˈbʊlˌrɔːrə)
n
(Instruments) a wooden slat attached to a thong that makes a roaring sound when the thong is whirled: used esp by native Australians in religious rites
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Several techniques, as often documented in the area, were used to convince the initiates (and the excluded crowd of women) that these powerful entities were actually present through artefacts specifically made for this purpose: decorated water-holes, animated masks, eerie sounds of hidden trumpets, and bullroarers and shadowy and complex figures displayed in the kurabu inside of which the initiates had to crawl after having been submitted to physical and psychological ordeals aimed at creating a receptive state of mind.
A growing interest in the animism of the object was further emphasized in Bullroarers, an installation of skateboards that have been subjected to an electrical discharge of 9,000 volts.
The singing dunes serve as a leitmotif for the arrival of the airplane--which finds its form with the help of a chorus of bullroarers causing the air to vibrate, evoking the din of an approaching engine.
The New Year and Christmas Romanian custom, many centuries old, is that those who go caroling and bidding the best for the year that is about to begin, with bullroarers or Little Plough poems, the goat sketch, Sorcova (a sort of enchantment, old and heathen, spoken on the first morning of the year) and Steaua, referring to the "star in the east" (said to have led the three wise men to where Christ was born) reenactment tradition, wear masks and are organized into bands.
Ora Barlow, a Maori woman from New Zealand spoke of over 200 indigenous Maori instruments, which were lost when Christian missionaries discouraged their usage and then of a recent revival of some, including bullroarers and ocarinas associated with ancient myths of their people and land.
On Tuesday from 1-3pm enjoy Australian Family Fun and create your own piece of Aboriginal artwork, didgeridoos, boomerangs, bullroarers and more.
The great sacred and secret totem boards were brought to me, and the smaller boards and bullroarers placed round about me, while all the men present chanted the sacred totem songs and waved green branches to and fro as we sat in a great circle round the 'totem' (dhu'gurr) fire.
In order of frequency the types were: boomerangs, shields, spear throwers, clubs, containers (coolamons, plates, boxes), walking sticks, stockwhip handles, bullroarers and other miscellaneous objects (including table tops).
Here, he carefully describes a variety of winds and strings, as well as the magical and religious rites for clappers, bullroarers, whistles, and hurdy-gurdies.
In many instances, music has represented a knowledge that men want to possess exclusively, causing women to be prohibited from the performance of certain instruments such as drums or even phallic-associated instruments such as flutes or bullroarers (Robertson, 1987).
It was some time since any central men's houses had been built there, so it happened that these bachelor quarters also housed men's ritual paraphernalia such as secret gourd instruments, bullroarers, drums, and dance ornaments.
Silverman discusses various objects and practices (anal birthing symbolism of the flutes, bullroarers, totemic excrement, riverine mud, and the myth and the rite of initiation), all of them affirming men's envy of female fertility and the masculinization of motherhood.