Bultow

Bul´tow`


n.1.A trawl; a boulter; the mode of fishing with a boulter or spiller.
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The bultow was simply long lines of several hundred metres with hundreds of baited hooks attached at regular intervals.
The attempted sabotage led a local newspaper editor to praise the trawl lines, and remark that "like every thing else that comes into collision with established customs (however ridiculous these customs may be) the bultow has had to make head way against a torrent of prejudice.
Not every commentator perceived that Warren blamed Newfoundland inshore fishing people and foreigners for over-exploiting cod, but they avidly seized on his warning that the use of bultows on the banks -- largely a foreign problem -- was the real threat: "that this bultow system must be excessively injurious to the shore fisheries, not perhaps of Newfoundland only, but in all the seas washing the eastern parts of America, seems credible; the great Banks on which the destruction is carried on being the principal breeding place of the cod.
By the mid-19th century, some Newfoundland fishing people were also using longline trawls, often called bultows.
Get your bultows to rights - ply your herring nets, and prepare your hooks and lines, aye and cod seines too, if you have them.
Official support for new technology, especially trawl lines, stemmed from the manner in which Newfoundland's main competitor, France, had successfully employed bultows in a reinvigorated migratory fishery on the Grand Banks off Newfoundland after 1815.
The colonial government's encouragement of bultows in the bank fishery suggested that it wanted to follow a policy of shifting the areal focus of exploitation of cod stocks to an offshore fishery because it knew that something was amiss inshore.
O'Flaherty knows this but weakly concludes: "Whether the bounties and seines and bultows and the sale of bait on the south coast really inhibited Newfoundland's progress might be argued.
12) It is also suggested by the fact that merchants began to restrict credit by the middle of the 19th century to fishers who could and would invest in technologies like bultows, cod seines, and cod traps that enabled them to catch more of a declining resource locally, or to those who could afford the larger vessels needed to seek out and harvest fishing grounds either further offshore, or in more remote regions off the coast of Labrador.
While bultows, seines, traps, and the bank and Labrador fishery may have provided short term solutions to problems of supply, they also meant that processors (the "shore crew") had to contend with large quantities of fish all at once.
Finding it increasingly difficult to sustain profitable enterprises, at around the middle of the nineteenth century merchants began to restrict credit to those who could and would invest in such technologies as bultows, cod seines, and cod traps that enabled them to catch more of a declining resource locally, or to those who could afford the larger vessels needed to seek out and harvest fishing grounds further offshore or in more remote regions off the coast of Labrador.
31) Moreover, while bultows, seines, traps, and the bank and Labrador fishery provided short-term solutions to problems of supply, they also meant that processors (the "shore crew") had to contend with large quantities of fish all at once.