bunch grass

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bunch grass

or bunch·grass (bŭnch′grăs′)
n.
Any of various grasses that grow in clumps or tufts rather than forming a sod or mat.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bunch′ grass`


n.
any of various grasses in different regions of North America, growing in distinct clumps.
[1830–40, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bunch grass - any of various grasses of many genera that grow in tufts or clumps rather than forming a sod or matbunch grass - any of various grasses of many genera that grow in tufts or clumps rather than forming a sod or mat; chiefly of western United States
grass - narrow-leaved green herbage: grown as lawns; used as pasture for grazing animals; cut and dried as hay
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References in periodicals archive ?
The canyon bottom is an expansive meadow system, characterized by a mix of native bunch grasses, smooth brome (Bromus inermis), and a diversity of weedy forbs.
Vegetation at the site--which has been grazed by cattle--includes: Alligator Juniper, Border pinyon, Arizona white oak, Emory oak (Quercus emoryi), Silverleaf oak (Quercus hypoleucoides), Desert spoon or Sotol (Dasylirion wheeleri), and various bunch grasses. On the afternoon of 15 July the authors returned to this location.
During a recent visit to a favorite place in north-central Oregon - where the ruts of Oregon Trail wagons are still clearly visible for more than a mile atop a plateau just west of the John Day River - I sat down amid the bunch grasses and wildflowers to enjoy the peace and quiet.
With few exceptions, seeds of warm-season bunch grasses, such as little bluestem, germinate best when planted directly into the soil in spring.
These gaps are circular, centered or more often excentric; single, double or triple gaps which develop mainly inside bunch grasses and are surrounded by a ring of tillers from the same tussock (Fig.
Along the way you'll see bunch grasses, annual wildflowers, and prickly pear cactus, as well as rust-and lime-colored lichens adorning banded rocks flecked with fool's gold.
Above timberline are grasslands dominated by bunch grasses, wetlands of sedges and rushes, and rocky hill slopes upon which other tropical alpine plants survive.
These areas were sparsely vegetated with bunch grasses, herbaceous species, and a variety of introduced plants used for their nitrogen-fixing abilities.
Bunch grasses, however, must produce seed for perpetuation and to increase the extent of turf areas.