bunch grass

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bunch grass

or bunch·grass (bŭnch′grăs′)
n.
Any of various grasses that grow in clumps or tufts rather than forming a sod or mat.

bunch′ grass`


n.
any of various grasses in different regions of North America, growing in distinct clumps.
[1830–40, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bunch grass - any of various grasses of many genera that grow in tufts or clumps rather than forming a sod or matbunch grass - any of various grasses of many genera that grow in tufts or clumps rather than forming a sod or mat; chiefly of western United States
grass - narrow-leaved green herbage: grown as lawns; used as pasture for grazing animals; cut and dried as hay
References in periodicals archive ?
Vegetation at the site--which has been grazed by cattle--includes: Alligator Juniper, Border pinyon, Arizona white oak, Emory oak (Quercus emoryi), Silverleaf oak (Quercus hypoleucoides), Desert spoon or Sotol (Dasylirion wheeleri), and various bunch grasses.
The best ones are native warm-season bunch grasses or sedges that stabilize the site and make great neighbors for perennial wildflowers.
PLANT SALE: Native bunch grasses, flowering perennials, trees and shrubs will be featured at the American Botanical Research Center and Nursery's 10th anniversary plant sale, hosted by Soka University.
These gaps are circular, centered or more often excentric; single, double or triple gaps which develop mainly inside bunch grasses and are surrounded by a ring of tillers from the same tussock (Fig.
Along the way you'll see bunch grasses, annual wildflowers, and prickly pear cactus, as well as rust-and lime-colored lichens adorning banded rocks flecked with fool's gold.
Above timberline are grasslands dominated by bunch grasses, wetlands of sedges and rushes, and rocky hill slopes upon which other tropical alpine plants survive.
These areas were sparsely vegetated with bunch grasses, herbaceous species, and a variety of introduced plants used for their nitrogen-fixing abilities.
Bunch grasses, however, must produce seed for perpetuation and to increase the extent of turf areas.
Meanwhile, cattle on the same pastures feast on bunch grasses such as the bluebunch wheatgrass and speargrass.