Bunsen burner


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Bunsen burner

n.
A small laboratory burner consisting of a vertical metal tube connected to a gas source and producing a very hot flame from a mixture of gas and air let in through adjustable holes at the base.

[After Robert Wilhelm Bunsen.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bunsen burner

n
(Chemistry) a gas burner, widely used in scientific laboratories, consisting of a metal tube with an adjustable air valve at the base
[C19: named after R. W. Bunsen]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bun′sen burn′er


n.
a gas burner with a hot flame, commonly used in laboratories.
[1865–70; after R. W. Bunsen]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bunsen burner

A small gas burner used in laboratories. It consists of a vertical metal tube connected to a gas fuel source, with adjustable holes at its base. These holes allow air to enter the tube and mix with the gas in order to make a very hot flame.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bunsen burner - a gas burner used in laboratoriesbunsen burner - a gas burner used in laboratories; has an air valve to regulate the mixture of gas and air
gas burner, gas jet - burner such that combustible gas issues from a nozzle to form a steady flame
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Bunsen burner

[ˌbʌnsnˈbɜːnəʳ] Nmechero m Bunsen
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
A large curved retort was boiling furiously in the bluish flame of a Bunsen burner, and the distilled drops were condensing into a two-litre measure.
A double line of glass-stoppered bottles was drawn up upon the wall opposite the door, and the table was littered over with Bunsen burners, test-tubes, and retorts.
If it's your birthday today, you share it with: 1811 Robert Bunsen, German inventor of Bunsen Burner (d.
In 2002, Otway achieved what he desired the most - a second hit that reached number 9 with his disco pastiche Bunsen Burner.
And just as he picked up a Bunsen burner to whip our bottoms, we heard wild high-pitched screams.
There's finger printing and footwear marks, getting DNA from a strawberry and a bit of chromatography you can do too." Dr Alan Greenwood, course leader for analytical chemistry and forensic science, was on hand to demonstrate how a simple Bunsen burner test can help identify evidence in investigations and how a forensic officer would go about collecting evidence from the crime scene.
New capabilities include the cone calorimeter, which measures heat release characteristics of finished fabrics more thoroughly than a traditional vertical flame test over a Bunsen burner.
Along with creating the rockets, the youngsters also got their first glimpse of a Bunsen burner and explored the properties of various materials such as sand, wood, | Astronaut Dr salt water and stone.
ABRIDE.TO.BE died in a house fire after her fridge-freezer exploded and was turned into a "Bunsen burner", an inquest has heard.
INTEGRA'S FIREBOY Safety Bunsen Burner ensures safety by eliminating the risk of gas leaking and explosion inherent in using alcohol burners, gas cookers and traditional Bunsen burners.