Bunsen burner

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Bunsen burner

n.
A small laboratory burner consisting of a vertical metal tube connected to a gas source and producing a very hot flame from a mixture of gas and air let in through adjustable holes at the base.

[After Robert Wilhelm Bunsen.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bunsen burner

n
(Chemistry) a gas burner, widely used in scientific laboratories, consisting of a metal tube with an adjustable air valve at the base
[C19: named after R. W. Bunsen]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bun′sen burn′er


n.
a gas burner with a hot flame, commonly used in laboratories.
[1865–70; after R. W. Bunsen]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bunsen burner

A small gas burner used in laboratories. It consists of a vertical metal tube connected to a gas fuel source, with adjustable holes at its base. These holes allow air to enter the tube and mix with the gas in order to make a very hot flame.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bunsen burner - a gas burner used in laboratoriesbunsen burner - a gas burner used in laboratories; has an air valve to regulate the mixture of gas and air
gas burner, gas jet - burner such that combustible gas issues from a nozzle to form a steady flame
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Bunsen burner

[ˌbʌnsnˈbɜːnəʳ] Nmechero m Bunsen
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
A double line of glass-stoppered bottles was drawn up upon the wall opposite the door, and the table was littered over with Bunsen burners, test-tubes, and retorts.
A large curved retort was boiling furiously in the bluish flame of a Bunsen burner, and the distilled drops were condensing into a two-litre measure.
To make yogurt they got the chance to use the Bunsen burners. In a small beaker they measured milk which was then heated before the gas was switched off allowing the milk to cool back down slightly.
Meanwhile, Bryson Dechambeau turned on the bunsen burners in Dubai to scorch to his fourth victory in nine starts.
It is a tube filled with gas which is then set alight - like having 50 mini Bunsen burners. It is named after German scientist Heinrich Ruben, who theorised that one could see sound, using fire.
These included looking inside cells using powerful microscopes, using Bunsen burners to carry out flame tests of select alkali and alkali-earth metals, burning magnesium to make sparklers and putting their hands through the flame.
Boys and bunsen burners - never a good mix Worse than that is the creepy feeling we might be watching yet another drama, like The Fall, or Apple Tree Yard, or countless others, where a flawed, ordinary woman ends up being punished just for having a sex life.
3 Science Workshop at Compton Verney Flasks, bunsen burners and lab coats at the ready!