bunting

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Related to Buntings: snow buntings

bunt·ing 1

 (bŭn′tĭng)
n.
1. A light cotton, woolen, or synthetic cloth used for making flags.
2. Flags considered as a group.
3. Strips of cloth or material usually in the colors of the national flag, used especially as drapery or streamers for festive decoration.

[Perhaps from German bunt, colored.]

bunt·ing 2

 (bŭn′tĭng)
n.
1. Any of various birds of the family Emberizidae, having short, cone-shaped bills and brownish, yellowish, or grayish plumage.
2. Any of various similar birds of the family Cardinalidae, often with brightly colored plumage.

[Middle English.]

bunt·ing 3

 (bŭn′tĭng)
n.
A snug-fitting, hooded sleeping bag or one-piece garment of heavy material for infants.

[Perhaps from Scots buntin, plump, short.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bunting

(ˈbʌntɪŋ)
n
1. (Textiles) a coarse, loosely woven cotton fabric used for flags, etc
2. decorative flags, pennants, and streamers
3. (Nautical Terms) flags collectively, esp those of a boat
[C18: of unknown origin]

bunting

(ˈbʌntɪŋ)
n
(Animals) any of numerous seed-eating songbirds of the families Fringillidae (finches, etc) or Emberizidae, esp those of the genera Emberiza of the Old World and Passerina of North America. They all have short stout bills
[C13: of unknown origin]

Bunting

(ˈbʌntɪŋ)
n
(Biography) Basil. 1900–85, British poet, author of Briggflatts (1966)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bun•ting1

(ˈbʌn tɪŋ)

n.
1. a coarse, open fabric of worsted or cotton for flags, signals, etc.
2. patriotic and festive decorations made from such cloth, or from paper, usu. in the colors of the national flag.
3. flags, esp. a vessel's flags, collectively.
[1735–45]

bun•ting2

(ˈbʌn tɪŋ)

n.
any of various small, chiefly seed-eating songbirds of the subfamilies Cardinalinae and Emberizinae (family Emberizidae).
[1250–1300; Middle English; of obscure orig.]

bun•ting3

(ˈbʌn tɪŋ)

n.
a hooded sleeping garment for infants.
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bunting - a loosely woven fabric used for flags, etc.
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
2.bunting - any of numerous seed-eating songbirds of Europe or North America
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
indigo bird, indigo bunting, indigo finch, Passerina cyanea - small deep blue North American bunting
Emberiza hortulana, ortolan, ortolan bunting - brownish Old World bunting often eaten as a delicacy
Emberiza schoeniclus, reed bunting - European bunting inhabiting marshy areas
Emberiza citrinella, yellow bunting, yellowhammer - European bunting the male being bright yellow
Emberiza aureola, yellow-breasted bunting - common in Russia and Siberia
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
الدُّرسه: طائِر
praporvlajkosláva
flagguirlande
fáni, fánaskreyting
gatvių papuošalaivėliavos
karodziņi
vlajkosláva
kutlama bayrakları

bunting

1 [ˈbʌntɪŋ] N (Orn) → escribano m

bunting

2 [ˈbʌntɪŋ] N (= decoration) → banderitas fpl, empavesado m; (= cloth) → lanilla f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bunting

[ˈbʌntɪŋ] nbanderoles fpl, drapeaux mpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bunting

1

bunting

2
n (= material)Fahnentuch nt; (= flags)bunte Fähnchen pl, → Wimpel pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bunting

[ˈbʌntɪŋ] n (Naut) → gran pavese m; (in street) → bandierine fpl
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

bunting

(ˈbantiŋ) noun
flags for use in celebrations.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Bitou carried a great bull on his shoulders; the water-wagtails, the warblers, and the buntings traverse the ocean."
They held both ends of this passage, and then thought to close on me, but I slipped through their fingers by doubling up Bunting's Thumb into Picnic Street.
The three men at her mast-head wore long streamers of narrow red bunting at their hats; from the stern, a whale-boat was suspended, bottom down; and hanging captive from the bowsprit was seen the long lower jaw of the last whale they had slain.
Then the party moved on again, and after crossing a broad river on a ferry and passing many fine farm houses that were dome shaped and painted a pretty green color, they came in sight of a large building that was covered with flags and bunting.
He has tossed in his hand squadrons of war-scarred three-deckers, and shredded out in mere sport the bunting of flags hallowed in the traditions of honour and glory.
In the windows of the houses also flags and bunting were displayed.
"Well, I make Assorted Flutters for flags and bunting, and a superior grade of Rustles for ladies' silk gowns."
"I'm awfully sorry I made fun of her doll when Jamie lugged it out; and I called her 'baby bunting' when she cried over the dead kitten.
For the moment, they were chattering with parrots of all colours, and grave cockatoos, who seemed to meditate upon some philosophical problem, whilst brilliant red lories passed like a piece of bunting carried away by the breeze, papuans, with the finest azure colours, and in all a variety of winged things most charming to behold, but few eatable.
The watch are taking down the extra awning; they are removing the bunting and the foot-lights.
From Orwell to the Dart there was no port which did not send forth its little fleet, gay with streamer and bunting, as for a joyous festival.
During our different passages south of the Plata, I often towed astern a net made of bunting, and thus caught many curious animals.