Bunyan


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Bunyan: bunion

Bun·yan

 (bŭn′yən), John 1628-1688.
English preacher and writer celebrated for his Pilgrim's Progress (two parts, 1678 and 1684), the allegorical tale of Christian's journey from the City of Destruction to the Celestial City.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bunyan

(ˈbʌnjən)
n
(Biography) John. 1628–88, English preacher and writer, noted particularly for his allegory The Pilgrim's Progress (1678)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bun•yan

(ˈbʌn yən)

n.
1. John, 1628–88, English: author of The Pilgrim's Progress.
2. Paul, Paul Bunyan.
Bun`yan•esque′, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bunyan - English preacher and author of an allegorical novel, Pilgrim's Progress (1628-1688)Bunyan - English preacher and author of an allegorical novel, Pilgrim's Progress (1628-1688)
2.Bunyan - a legendary giant lumberjack of the north woods of the United States and CanadaBunyan - a legendary giant lumberjack of the north woods of the United States and Canada; "Paul Bunyan had a blue ox named Babe"; "the lakes of Minnesota began when Paul Bunyan and Babe's footprints filled with water"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
THE second great Puritan writer of England was John Bunyan. He was born in 1628, more than twenty years after Milton.
Bunyan mentions that above twenty thousand cartloads of wholesome instructions had been thrown in here without effect."
Besides all this, he had read his Bible, including the apocryphal books; Poor Richard's Almanac, Taylor's Holy Living and Dying, The Pilgrim's Progress, with Bunyan's Life and Holy War, a great deal of Bailey's Dictionary, Valentine and Orson, and part of a History of Babylon, which Bartle Massey had lent him.
who didst not refuse to the swart convict, Bunyan, the pale, poetic pearl; Thou who didst clothe with doubly hammered leaves of finest gold, the stumped and paupered arm of old Cervantes; Thou who didst pick up Andrew Jackson from the pebbles; who didst hurl him upon a war-horse; who didst thunder him higher than a throne!
Like Dante or Bunyan, he has a revelation of another life; like Bacon, he is profoundly impressed with the unity of knowledge; in the early Church he exercised a real influence on theology, and at the Revival of Literature on politics.
Sometimes a light glimmered out of the physician's eyes, burning blue and ominous, like the reflection of a furnace, or, let us say, like one of those gleams of ghastly fire that darted from Bunyan's awful doorway in the hillside, and quivered on the pilgrim's face.
On the very next Friday after this "dreadfullest fight that ever was seen," as Bunyan says in Pilgrim's Progress, there were great doings in the little schoolhouse on the hill.
Sometimes, when much excited with his subject, he had an odd way - compounded of John Bunyan, and Balfour of Burley - of taking his great quarto Bible under his arm and pacing up and down the pulpit with it; looking steadily down, meantime, into the midst of the congregation.
Maggie ran in an instant to the corner of the room, jumped on a chair, and reached down from the small bookcase a shabby old copy of Bunyan, which opened at once, without the least trouble of search, at the picture she wanted.
Tom received the compliment with becoming modesty, and began to look as affable as was consistent, as John Bunyan says, "with his doggish nature."
Sir William Ashton is a mask for a vulgar temptation, Ravenswood Castle a fine name for proud poverty, and the foreign mission of state only a Bunyan disguise for honest industry.
Dante, Bunyan, and others appear to have been exercised in their minds more than we: they were subjected to a kind of culture such as our district schools and colleges do not contemplate.