buoyancy

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buoy·an·cy

 (boi′ən-sē, bo͞o′yən-)
n.
1.
a. The tendency or capacity to remain afloat in a liquid or rise in air or gas.
b. The upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense than itself.
2. Ability to recover quickly from setbacks; resilience.
3. Lightness of spirit; cheerfulness.

buoyancy

(ˈbɔɪənsɪ)
n
1. the ability to float in a liquid or to rise in a fluid
2. (General Physics) the property of a fluid to exert an upward force (upthrust) on a body that is wholly or partly submerged in it
3. the ability to recover quickly after setbacks; resilience
4. cheerfulness

buoy•an•cy

(ˈbɔɪ ən si, ˈbu yən si)

also buoy′ance,



n.
1. the power to float or rise in a fluid; relative lightness.
2. the power of supporting a body so that it floats; upward pressure exerted by the fluid in which a body is immersed.
3. lightness of spirit.
[1705–15]

buoy·an·cy

(boi′ən-sē)
The upward force that a fluid exerts on an object that is less dense than itself. Buoyancy allows a boat to float on water.

buoyancy

The upthrust (upward force) on a body placed in a fluid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buoyancy - cheerfulness that bubbles to the surface
blitheness, cheerfulness - a feeling of spontaneous good spirits; "his cheerfulness made everyone feel better"
2.buoyancy - the property of something weightless and insubstantialbuoyancy - the property of something weightless and insubstantial
weightlessness, lightness - the property of being comparatively small in weight; "the lightness of balsa wood"
3.buoyancy - the tendency to float in water or other liquid
tendency, inclination - a characteristic likelihood of or natural disposition toward a certain condition or character or effect; "the alkaline inclination of the local waters"; "fabric with a tendency to shrink"
4.buoyancy - irrepressible liveliness and good spirit; "I admired his buoyancy and persistent good humor"
sprightliness, liveliness, spirit, life - animation and energy in action or expression; "it was a heavy play and the actors tried in vain to give life to it"

buoyancy

noun
1. floatability, lightness, weightlessness Air can be pumped into the diving suit to increase buoyancy.
2. cheerfulness, bounce (informal), pep, animation, good humour, high spirits, zing (informal), liveliness, spiritedness, cheeriness, sunniness a mood of buoyancy and optimism
3. expansion, development, strength, mushrooming, economic growth The slump will be followed by a period of buoyancy.

buoyancy

noun
The ability to recover quickly from depression or discouragement:
Translations
طَفَوِيَّه: قابِلِيَّةُ الطَّفو
schopnost ploutvznosnostvztlak
opdriftflydeevne
noste
felhajtóerõ
flothæfni
opwaartse kracht
schopnosť plávaťvztlak
yüzebilme

buoyancy

[ˈbɔɪənsɪ] N
1. (Phys) [of ship, object] → capacidad f para flotar, flotabilidad f; [of liquid] → sustentación f hidraúlica (Aer) → fuerza f ascensional
2. (fig) → optimismo m
3. (Fin) [of market, prices] → tendencia f al alza

buoyancy

[ˈbɔɪənsi] n
[ship] → flottabilité f
[mood] → entrain m
[market] → fermeté f

buoyancy

n
(of ship, object)Schwimmfähigkeit f; (of liquid)Auftrieb m; buoyancy aidSchwimmhilfe f; (for canoeing) → Kajakweste f
(fig: = cheerfulness) → Schwung m, → Elan m
(Fin: of market, prices) → Festigkeit f; (= resilience)Erholungsfähigkeit f

buoyancy

[ˈbɔɪənsɪ] n (Phys) → galleggiamento; (of ship, object) → galleggiabilità (fig) (of person) → ottimismo

buoy

(boi) , ((American) ˈbu:i) noun
a floating anchored mark, acting as a guide, warning or mooring point for boats.

see also lifebuoy.
ˈbuoyancy noun
the ability to float on water or in the air. the buoyancy of a balloon.
ˈbuoyant adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
With oil imports dropping and China warning of a "grim" trade outlook, the world's second-biggest oil consumer may not be the buoyant force it has been for oil markets in the past decade.
The buoyant force in the radial direction (driven by the high value of [g.
In water, all objects experience an upward buoyant force equal to the weight of the water they displace.
The force of the water against the object is called the Buoyant Force.
Pitsco says that its Inflation Station is the perfect hot-air balloon launcher for educational purposes that include demonstrating buoyant force and exciting scientific imagination.
Soups, noodles and other heatable foods are a buoyant force in the market.
materials are irrelevant to the magnitude of buoyant force exerted on
To demonstrate Archimedes' principle - ``The buoyant force on an object is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object'' - his class builds aluminum foil boats, sinks them with marbles, and figures out displacement of the water by the weight of the marbles.
Just as the submerged part of an iceberg displaces seawater, providing a buoyant force that supports the part of the iceberg above water, submerged crust on Earth displaces the denser mantle, keeping afloat highland features that stick out above the surface.
Because helium is about seven times less dense than air, it provided enough buoyant force (upward force on an object immersed In air or liquid) for the balloon cluster to rise.