Burgess Shale


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Related to Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion

Burgess Shale

A rock formation in the western Canadian Rockies containing a wealth of fossilized invertebrates of the early Cambrian Period that were buried by an underwater avalanche of fine silt, preserving many details of their soft parts and providing valuable information about the evolution of early life.

[After nearby Mount Burgess.]

Burgess Shale

n
1. (Placename) a bed of Cambrian sedimentary rock in the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia containing many unique invertebrate fossils
2. (Geological Science) a bed of Cambrian sedimentary rock in the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia containing many unique invertebrate fossils
[named after the Burgess Pass, where the bed is exposed]

Bur·gess Shale

(bûr′jĭs)
A rock formation in the western Canadian Rockies that contains numerous fossilized invertebrates from the early Cambrian Period.
Did You Know? Early animals on the Earth included many oddities. These animals had bizarre combinations of legs, spines, segments, and heads found in no animals since, as if Nature were trying out different models to see what might work best. Many of these animals became extinct and left no descendants. Others may have evolved into groups that are well known today. We know a lot about these bizarre life forms thanks to the Burgess Shale, a 540-million-year-old formation of black shale in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia. Unlike most rocks in which fossils are preserved, the Burgess Shale preserved the soft parts of organisms that normally would have rotted away (by reacting with oxygen) before the animals became fossils. This happened because the animals were killed instantly by a mudslide deep in the ocean, where there is very little oxygen. After the mud buried the animals, it hardened into shale. Thanks to this, we know a lot about the period of early animal evolution known as the Cambrian Explosion.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of geochemical and distinctive mineralogical features associated with the Kinzers and Burgess Shale formations and their associated units.
Perhaps the most iconic of all exceptional fossil deposits is the Burgess Shale of Canada, popularised by Stephen J.
Paleontologists from the Royal Ontario Museum and the University of Toronto have revealed more insight into the Habelia optata--a sea predator which belongs to the arthropods and lived during the middle Cambrian period about 508 million years ago--from fossil records found in the Burgess Shale fossil deposit in British Columbia.
It was also believed to have lived during the middle Cambrian period 508 million years ago, hence its age, and was from the renowned Burgess Shale fossil deposit in British Columbia.
BURGESS SHALE ANIMAL Hurdia, from the World Heritage Site in British Columbia, is a strange extinct animal from the 510 million years old Burgess Shale - famous for its unique fossils.
sparsa fossils from the Burgess Shale in Canada revealed that the 10- to 50-millimeter-long critter had a small pair of simple eyes set atop a narrow head.
It's a lot of money for something made by the BBC." Pensioner Burgess Shale complained about there being no cheaper tickets for older fans.
Some of the more famous examples are the Burgess Shale in Canada, which preserves soft body outlines of 530,000,000-year-old Cambrian animals; the Jurassic Solenhofen limestones in Germany, where the famous Archaeopteryx is found; and the middle Eocene Messel Oil Shale in Germany, which preserves whole skeletons of many birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and insects.
These fossils originated from the Burgess Shale in western Canada, one of the worlds richest source of fossils from the period.
The famous Burgess Shale is considerably younger, dating at about 505 million years, and the end of the Cambrian Period is set at 490 million years.
Washington, February 12 ( ANI ): A treasure trove of fossils has been discovered in a canyon in Canada's Kootenay National Park, 40 kilometers from Burgess Shale, which is considered one of the most important fossil fields in the world.
Every specimen of Pikaia discovered so far has come from the Burgess Shale fossil beds in Canada's Yoho National Park, which date back 505 million years.