Burgundy


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Burgundy: Burgundy wine

Bur·gun·dy 1

 (bûr′gən-dē)
1. A ducal house of Burgundy split into the Capetian line (1032-1361) and the Cadet, or Valois, line (1363-1477).
2. A Portuguese dynasty (1139-1383) beginning with Alfonso I, who made Portugal an independent kingdom.

Bur·gun·dy 2

 (bûr′gən-dē) also Bour·gogne (bo͞or-gôn′yə)
A historical region and former duchy of eastern France. The area was first organized into a kingdom by the Burgundii, a Germanic people, in the 5th century ad. At the height of its later power in the 14th and 15th centuries, Burgundy controlled vast territories in present-day Netherlands, Belgium, and northeast France. It was incorporated into the French crown lands by Louis XI in 1477.

Bur·gun′di·an (bər-gŭn′dē-ən) adj. & n.

Bur·gun·dy 3

 (bûr′gən-dē)
n. pl. Bur·gun·dies
1.
a. Any of various red or white wines produced in the Burgundy region of France.
b. Any of various similar wines produced elsewhere.
2. burgundy A dark grayish or blackish red to dark purplish red or reddish brown.

Burgundy

(ˈbɜːɡəndɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Placename) a region of E France famous for its wines, lying west of the Saône: formerly a semi-independent duchy; annexed to France in 1482. French name: Bourgogne
2. (Placename) Free County of Burgundy another name for Franche-Comté
3. (Historical Terms) a monarchy (1384–1477) of medieval Europe, at its height including the Low Countries, the duchy of Burgundy, and Franche-Comté
4. (Historical Terms) Kingdom of Burgundy a kingdom in E France, established in the early 6th century ad, eventually including the later duchy of Burgundy, Franche-Comté, and the Kingdom of Provence: known as the Kingdom of Arles from the 13th century
5. (Brewing)
a. any red or white wine produced in the region of Burgundy, around Dijon
b. any heavy red table wine
6. (Colours) (often not capital) a blackish-purple to purplish-red colour

Bur•gun•dy

(ˈbɜr gən di)

n., pl. -dies for 2,3.
1. a historic region in central France: a former kingdom, duchy, and province.
2. a metropolitan region in central France. 1,609,000; 12,194 sq. mi. (31,582 sq. km).
3. any of the red or white wines produced in this region.
4. (often l.c.) a red wine produced elsewhere.
5. (l.c.) a grayish red-brown to blackish-purple color.
French, Bourgogne (for defs. 1,2,7).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Burgundy - a former province of eastern France that is famous for its wines
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
2.Burgundy - red table wine from the Burgundy region of France (or any similar wine made elsewhere)Burgundy - red table wine from the Burgundy region of France (or any similar wine made elsewhere)
vino, wine - fermented juice (of grapes especially)
Beaujolais - dry fruity light red wine drunk within a few months after it is made; from the Beaujolais district in southeastern France
white Burgundy, Chablis - dry white table wine of Chablis, France or a wine resembling it
Montrachet - a white Burgundy wine
3.burgundy - a dark purplish-red to blackish-red color
dark red - a red color that reflects little light
Translations
Burgundia

Burgundy

[ˈbɜːgəndɪ] N
1. (Geog) → Borgoña f
2. (= wine) → vino m de Borgoña

Burgundy

[ˈbɜːrgəndi] nBourgogne f

burgundy

[ˈbɜːrgəndi]
adj [jacket, curtains] → bordeaux inv
n
(= colour) → bordeaux m
(= wine) → bourgogne m

Burgundy

nBurgund nt; (= wine)Burgunder m

Burgundy

[ˈbɜːgndɪ] nBorgogna
References in classic literature ?
Say to him, then, to his beard,'' continued Malvoisin, coolly, ``that you love this captive Jewess to distraction; and the more thou dost enlarge on thy passion, the greater will be his haste to end it by the death of the fair enchantress; while thou, taken in flagrant delict by the avowal of a crime contrary to thine oath, canst hope no aid of thy brethren, and must exchange all thy brilliant visions of ambition and power, to lift perhaps a mercenary spear in some of the petty quarrels between Flanders and Burgundy.
They found by my eating that a small quantity would not suffice me; and being a most ingenious people, they slung up, with great dexterity, one of their largest hogsheads, then rolled it towards my hand, and beat out the top; I drank it off at a draught, which I might well do, for it did not hold half a pint, and tasted like a small wine of Burgundy, but much more delicious.
Some day, when you are tired of London, come down to Treadley and expound to me your philosophy of pleasure over some admirable Burgundy I am fortunate enough to possess.
What wit in the world can persuade another that the story of the Princess Floripes and Guy of Burgundy is not true, or that of Fierabras and the bridge of Mantible, which happened in the time of Charlemagne?
This pantry opened into a kind of wash-up kitchen, and in this was firewood; there was also a cupboard, in which we found nearly a dozen of burgundy, tinned soups and salmon, and two tins of biscuits.
Terror had had such an effect upon the poor girl that she had never ceased walking from Paris till she reached Burgundy, her native place.
When they are, it is easier to hold them, especially when they have not been accustomed to self- government; and to hold them securely it is enough to have destroyed the family of the prince who was ruling them; because the two peoples, preserving in other things the old conditions, and not being unlike in customs, will live quietly together, as one has seen in Brittany, Burgundy, Gascony, and Normandy, which have been bound to France for so long a time: and, although there may be some difference in language, nevertheless the customs are alike, and the people will easily be able to get on amongst themselves.
There he found Madeleine alarmed for his safety and anxious to tell him all the events of the evening, but he cut her short by ordering her to put his supper in his room and give him with it a bottle of good Burgundy.
Let me never hear any ill words against the fare of the Bastile," said he, half closing his eyes; "happy are the prisoners who can get only half a bottle of such Burgundy every day.
Now for the direct expression," said Stalky, and moved on the Burgundy recommended by the faculty to enrich fever-thinned blood.
It was built by Jean Sans-Peur, Duke of Burgundy, to set his conscience at rest--he had assassinated the Duke of Orleans.
through his brother, Pierre, Seigneur de Beaujeu, who had married the king's eldest daughter, and to Charles the Bold through his mother, Agnes of Burgundy.