glossodynia

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glossodynia

(ˌɡlɒsəʊˈdɪnɪə)
n
(Pathology) med a condition characterized by a burning or tingling mouth region
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glossodynia - pain in the tongue
hurting, pain - a symptom of some physical hurt or disorder; "the patient developed severe pain and distension"
References in periodicals archive ?
Other known entities for orofacial pain are burning mouth syndrome, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, and neurovascular orofacial pain.
Some patients also experience burning mouth syndrome from amalgam tattoos.
2018 Undergraduate Informative Poster Competition honorable mention recipients are Hunter Frederick (left) and Rebecca Meats (right) from the University of Missouri - Kansas City for Burning Mouth Syndrome: What Would You Do?.
Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by burning symptoms in the oral cavity and with clinically healthy appearance of the oral mucosa, affecting mostly postmenopausal women (1).
Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), also known as stomatodynia, is characterized by pain or discomfort in the oral mucosal without a known cause (1).
A deficiency in vitamin D may cause burning mouth syndrome. Symptoms of this condition may include a burning mouth sensation, a metallic or bitter taste in the mouth, and dry mouth.
The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) has described burning mouth syndrome as a chronic condition characterised by a burning sensation of the oral mucosa for which no cause can be found [1].
Other conditions related to the wearing of complete dentures include altered taste perception, burning mouth syndrome, and gagging.
Burning Mouth Syndrome: A New Study on Alpha-Lipoic Acid
VALENCIA, SPAIN -- Sucking on a clonazepam tablet for 3 minutes after every meal reduced pain, paresthesia, dry mouth, and altered sense of taste in patients with burning mouth syndrome in a retrospective study.
Nondental causes of oral facial pain can be associated with oral mucosal disorders, malignant disease and its therapy, salivary gland disorders, maxillary sinusitis, burning mouth syndrome, or atypical odontalgia.