ragweed

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rag·weed

 (răg′wēd′)
n.
1. Any of various weeds of the genus Ambrosia of the composite family, having small, greenish, unisexual flower heads and producing abundant pollen that is one of the chief causes of hay fever.
2. Chiefly British Ragwort.

[From the ragged shape of its leaves.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ragweed

(ˈræɡˌwiːd)
n
(Plants) any plant of the chiefly North American genus Ambrosia, such as A. artemisiifolia (common ragweed): family Asteraceae (composites). Their green tassel-like flowers produce large amounts of pollen, which causes hay fever. Also called: ambrosia
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rag•weed

(ˈrægˌwid)

n.
any of the composite plants of the genus Ambrosia, the airborne pollen of which is the most prevalent cause of autumnal hay fever.
[1650–60; so called from its ragged appearance]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ragweed - widespread European weed having yellow daisylike flowersragweed - widespread European weed having yellow daisylike flowers; sometimes an obnoxious weed and toxic to cattle if consumed in quantity
genus Senecio, Senecio - enormous and diverse cosmopolitan genus of trees and shrubs and vines and herbs including many weeds
weed - any plant that crowds out cultivated plants
2.ragweed - any of numerous chiefly North American weedy plants constituting the genus Ambrosia that produce highly allergenic pollen responsible for much hay fever and asthmaragweed - any of numerous chiefly North American weedy plants constituting the genus Ambrosia that produce highly allergenic pollen responsible for much hay fever and asthma
genus Ambrosia - comprising the ragweeds; in some classification considered the type genus of a separate family Ambrosiaceae
Ambrosia artemisiifolia, common ragweed - annual weed with finely divided foliage and spikes of green flowers; common in North America; introduced elsewhere accidentally
Ambrosia trifida, great ragweed - a coarse annual with some leaves deeply and palmately three-cleft or five-cleft
Ambrosia psilostachya, perennial ragweed, western ragweed - coarse perennial ragweed with creeping roots of dry barren lands of southwestern United States and Mexico
weed - any plant that crowds out cultivated plants
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ragweed

[ˈrægwiːd] Nambrosía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ragweed

n (bot) ambrosía
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
annual bursage Ambrosia chamissonis (Less.) Greene beach bur-sage Ambrosia psilostachya DC.
Vegetation is dominated by woody shrubs including creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), black brush (Coleogyne ramosissima), bursage (Ambrosia dumosa), and shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia).
This section of the park suffers from very low rainfall and, thus, about 80 percent of the lowlands are covered by a mixture of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) and triangle-leafed bursage (Ambrosia deltoides).
These include the boojum and elephant trees, a bursage with fruits more like a cactus, and such real cacti as the sour pitahaya and cardon.
Common weeds including sunflower, cocklebur, bursage, morning glory, horseweed, sacred datura, poison hemlock and fava beans may host glassy-winged sharpshooter and be infected with xylella fastidiosa, the bacteria that causes Pierce's disease (PD), according to a study published in Plant Disease.
There are no clouds to offer shade for the hardy yellow-dappled creosote bushes, white bursage shrubs and saguaro cacti, archetypal symbol of the West.