Burundi

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Burundi

Bu·run·di

 (bo͝o-ro͞on′dē, -ro͝on′-)
A country of east-central Africa with a coastline on Lake Tanganyika. It was inhabited originally by the Twa, a Pygmy people, and later also by Hutus and Tutsis, the latter gaining political and economic dominance in the 19th century. The area formed part of German East Africa and later of Belgian-ruled Ruanda-Urundi before it became an independent kingdom in 1962 and was declared a republic in 1966. In the 1970s and again in the 1990s tens of thousands of people were killed in ethnic clashes between Hutus and Tutsis. Bujumbura is the capital and the largest city.

Bu·run′di·an adj. & n.

Burundi

(bəˈrʊndɪ)
n
(Placename) a republic in E central Africa: inhabited chiefly by the Hutu, Tutsi, and Twa (Pygmy); made part of German East Africa in 1899; part of the Belgian territory of Ruanda-Urundi from 1923 until it became independent in 1962; ethnic violence has erupted at times between Hutu and Tutsi, as in Rwanda; consists mainly of high plateaus along the main Nile-Congo dividing range, dropping rapidly to the Great Rift Valley in the west. Official languages: Kirundi and French. Religion: Christian majority. Currency: Burundi franc. Capital: Bujumbura. Pop: 10 888 321 (2013 est). Area: 27 731 sq km (10 707 sq miles). Former name (until 1962): Urundi

Bu•run•di

(bʊˈrʊn di)

n.
a republic in central Africa, E of the Democratic Republic of the Congo: formerly the S part of the Belgian trust territory of Ruanda-Urundi; gained independence 1962. 5,735,937; 10,747 sq. mi. (27,834 sq. km). Cap.: Bujumbura.
Bu•run′di•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Burundi - a landlocked republic in east central Africa on the northeastern shore of Lake TanganyikaBurundi - a landlocked republic in east central Africa on the northeastern shore of Lake Tanganyika
East Africa - a geographical area in eastern Africa
Bujumbura, capital of Burundi, Usumbura - the capital and largest city of Burundi; "Usumbura was renamed Bujumbura when Burundi became independent in 1962"
Africa - the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
Hutu - a member of a Bantu people living in Rwanda and Burundi
Tutsi, Watusi, Watutsi - a member of a Bantu speaking people living in Rwanda and Burundi
Burundian - a native or inhabitant of Burundi
Adj.1.Burundi - of or relating to or characteristic of Burundi or its people; "the Burundi capital"
Translations
Бурунди
Burundi
Burundi
Burundi
Burundi
Burundi
ブルンジ
Burundi
Burundi
Burundi
Burundi
Burundi
Burundi

Burundi

[bəˈrʊndɪ] NBurundi m
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the number of Burundians suffering from food shortage reduced by 35 percent, the situations remain to be a source of concern, Bader A.
They include 59 Ugandans, seven Burundians and five Tanzanians.
As the result of a complex political, economic, and security crisis that began in 2015, more than 420,000 Burundians sought refuge in neighboring countries and many others sought refuge at internally displaced persons camps or moved to the homes of extended family members.
They include many Rwandans, Burundians and Congolese, Kevin says.
According to the World Food Program, 58% of Burundians face chronic malnutrition, and the World Bank reports that 53% of Burundian children's growth is stunted.
On average, 120 to 150 Burundians are arriving daily to Tanzania now, down from thousands at the start of the conflict.
The everyday reality for Burundians in the capital is grim.
The new rebel group's main objective is to protect Burundians who are being killed because they are protesting the violation of the country's constitution by President Pierre Nkurunziza who extended his time in power, said Lieutenant Colonel Edouard Nshimirimana, who was in charge of military transmissions and communications before he defected in September.
Friday's fighting is apparently part of violence linked to the ruling party's announcement in April that Nkurunziza would run for a third term, which many Burundians and foreign observers had opposed as unconstitutional and in violation of peace accords.
7 deadline for Burundians to voluntarily give up their firearms or risk being "dealt with as enemies of the nation," after months of violent protests over his re-election in July and a failed coup d'etat.
At the local level, 72% of Burundians say economic conditions are getting worse, and 10% say it is a good time to find a job in the city or area where they live.