bustard

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Related to Bustards: Otididae, houbara bustards

bus·tard

 (bŭs′tərd)
n.
Any of various large, long-legged Old World game birds of the family Otididae that nest on the ground and frequent dry grassy plains.

[Middle English, from blend of Old French bistarde and Old French oustarde, both from Latin avis tarda : avis, bird; see awi- in Indo-European roots + tarda, feminine of tardus, slow.]

bustard

(ˈbʌstəd)
n
(Animals) any terrestrial bird of the family Otididae, inhabiting open regions of the Old World: order Gruiformes (cranes, rails, etc). They have long strong legs, a heavy body, a long neck, and speckled plumage
[C15: from Old French bistarde, influenced by Old French oustarde, both from Latin avis tarda slow bird]

bus•tard

(ˈbʌs tərd)

n.
any of various chiefly terrestrial birds of the family Otididae, of the Old World and Australia.
[1425–75; late Middle English, appar. b. Middle French bistarde and oustarde, both < Latin avis tarda literally, slow bird]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bustard - large heavy-bodied chiefly terrestrial game bird capable of powerful swift flightbustard - large heavy-bodied chiefly terrestrial game bird capable of powerful swift flight; classified with wading birds but frequents grassy steppes
wader, wading bird - any of many long-legged birds that wade in water in search of food
great bustard, Otis tarda - largest European land bird
Choriotis australis, plain turkey - popular Australian game bird
Translations

bustard

[ˈbʌstəd] Navutarda f

bustard

nTrappe f
References in classic literature ?
There were sparrow hawks, with white breasts, and kestrels, and down the slopes scampered, with their long legs, several fine fat bustards. I leave anyone to imagine the covetousness of the Canadian at the sight of this savoury game, and whether he did not regret having no gun.
Then I saw that the birds were a flock of /pauw/ or bustards, and that they would pass within fifty yards of my head.
Once a white-necked sea eagle soared screaming high over the traveller's head, and again a flock of brown bustards popped up from among the bracken, and blundered away in their clumsy fashion, half running, half flying, with strident cry and whirr of wings.
We may imagine that the early progenitor of the ostrich had habits like those of a bustard, and that as natural selection increased in successive generations the size and weight of its body, its legs were used more, and its wings less, until they became incapable of flight.
Four themes will help introduce the students to the importance of houbara bustards.
Eleven Asian houbara bustards rescued in January after a failed smuggling attempt on the UAE's border with Oman have been released back into the wild by the International Fund for Houbara Conservation (IFHC).
Three weeks since their release, the bustards' GPS trackers indicate all 11 houbara are alive and well after rejoining the species' annual migratory route north.
Houbara bustards being captive bred at the Agricultural Research Station in Rawdat Al Faras, Qatar.
According to the permits signed by the foreign ministry's Deputy Chief of Protocol Mohammad Adeel Pervaiz, Governor of Tabuk Prince Fahd bin Sultan Abdul Aziz Al-Saud of Saudi Arabia has been allowed to hunt houbara bustards in Awaran district and Nushki (excluding Nushki city) and Chagai district (excluding the area in the northwest corner of Balochistan located in Chagai district (Nokundi) and Prince Mansour bin Mohammad S.
These birds include houbara bustards, cranes, teals, pintails, mallards, geese, spoonbills, waders, and pelicans.Illegal and licensed huntingArab royals frequently visit Pakistan at the invitation of local politicians and government officials, who arrange hunting safaris for them.
At least 50% of the revenue generated by the hunting fees would be spent on the development of these areas while 35% would be given to Obara Foundation so that the numbers of houbara bustards could be increased.
Houbara bustards are indigenous to the Central Asian region and migrate to Pakistan every year in winter to avoid harsh weather conditions at home.