exenatide

(redirected from Byetta)
Also found in: Medical.

ex·en·a·tide

 (ĕk′sĕn′ə-tīd′, ĭg-zĕn′-)
n.
An injectable drug that is a synthetic analog of a digestive hormone and stimulates insulin secretion when blood sugar levels are high, used to treat type 2 diabetes.

[exen(din-4), peptide found in the saliva of the Gila monster, of which exenatide is a synthetic version (ex(ocrine) + end(ocrine) + -in, due to the fact that it is an exocrine secretion with endocrine activity) + peptide.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

exenatide

n exenatida
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fujioka recommended adding the glucagonlike peptide-1 [GLPl ] receptor diabetes drug exenatide (Byetta; Bydureon) or the appetite suppressant phentermine (Adipex-p; Lomaira) to an SGLT2 inhibitor.
In conjunction, the company's proposed Phase 1 pharmacokinetic (PK) study is a fully-randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled four way crossover study that will evaluate safety and the pharmacokinetics of ORMD-0901 compared to placebo and to open label Byetta, a GLP-1 analog, in up to 15 healthy subjects.
Receptor Agonists Bydureon (exenatide Bydureon or extended release), Byetta Byetta (exenatide) Glaucoma Xalatan (latanoprost) Lumigan v.
Lexi Pharma team members have collectively filed 15 New Drug Applications and have been involved in the development and launch of successfully marketed products including: Byetta, Bydureon, Camptosar, Dacogen, Ellence, Emcyt, Erbitux, Folotyn, Panretin, Symlin, Sutent, Targretin, Vidaza, Velcade, and Zarnestra.
Those approved in the United States are albiglutide (Tanzeum), dulaglutide (Trulicity), exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon), and liraglutide (Saxenda, Victoza).
Another anti-diabetic drug is Exenatide (Byetta), which is a glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue (GLP-1).
But drugs, such as Byetta, which increase the body's production of insulin, can cause glucose levels to dip too low and lead to life-threatening hypoglycemia, as well as other side effects.
A doctor suggested that she start on an injectable drug called Byetta, which costs close to $500 per month, nearly double the price when it was introduced in 2006.
The diabetes joint venture includes the oral medicines Onglyza, Kombiglyze and Forxiga as well as the injectable treatments Bydureon and Byetta. Last month the venture received a boost when an advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration endorsed its new diabetes pill dapagliflozin.
Medications such as exenatide (Byetta) are called incretin mimetics, because they mimic incretins, which are hormones released into the blood when we digest food.
This synthetic form of exendin-4, which has FDA approval, is marketed under the names of Byetta and Bydureon.