Byronic


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By·ron

 (bī′rən), George Gordon Sixth Baron Byron. 1788-1824.
British poet acclaimed as one of the leading figures of the romantic movement. The "Byronic hero"—lonely, rebellious, and brooding—first appeared in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (1812-1818). Among his other works are Manfred (1817) and the epic satire Don Juan (1819-1824). He died while working to secure Greek independence from the Turks.

By·ron′ic (bī-rŏn′ĭk) adj.
By·ron′i·cal·ly adv.

By•ron•ic

(baɪˈrɒn ɪk)

adj.
of or like Lord Byron or his work, as in displaying romanticism.
[1815–25]
By•ron′i•cal•ly, adv.
References in classic literature ?
People said that he resembled Byron--at least that his head was Byronic; but he was a bearded, tranquil Byron, who might live on a thousand years without growing old.
His imagination and the books he had read had inspired in him a desire for the Byronic attitude; and he was torn between a morbid self-consciousness and a conviction that he owed it to himself to be gallant.
But in spite of all this melodramatic clap-trap the romances, like 'Childe Harold,' are filled with the tremendous Byronic passion, which, as in 'Childe Harold,' lends great power alike to their narrative and their description.
In the most important of them, 'Manfred,' a treatment of the theme which Marlowe and Goethe had used in 'Faust,' his real power is largely thwarted by the customary Byronic mystery and swagger.
Though not cold-natured, he was rather bright than hot--less Byronic than Shelleyan; could love desperately, but with a love more especially inclined to the imaginative and ethereal; it was a fastidious emotion which could jealously guard the loved one against his very self.
A sort of Byronic hero--an amorous conspirator, it strikes me.
But there came a time when Laurie ceased to worship at many shrines, hinted darkly at one all-absorbing passion, and indulged occasionally in Byronic fits of gloom.
Immediately the sound of the strings was transformed, cutting and dark as Tchaikovsky's tortured Manfred Symphony (continuing the Byronic topic) opened, and this transformation spread across the orchestra and even to the podium.
A cosmic play, which defies simple description, the Undivine Comedy is both a de-masking of the Byronic ideal of the poet, whose nefarious, and selfish devotion to the ideal has evil consequences for real human beings, and a prophetic warning of the fratricidal class warfare that was to roil the first decades of the twentieth century.
Jonas Taylor (Jason Statham) is a deep-diving Byronic hero.
Or will we, after the traumas of 1947 and 1971, prefer to live out the rest of our lives in Byronic lassitude: 'Now hatred is by far the longest pleasure; / Men love in haste, but they detest at leisure.'
In Liliom, Molnar produced one of the rarest manifestations of the sinister: This young man, lacking either Byronic charm or Marlowe-grade evil, is a savage.