Byronism


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Byronism

the characteristics of the poetry and writings of George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824).
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(28.) Judson, "Tragicomedy, Bisexuality, and Byronism; or
The nineteenth-century poet Lord Byron, for instance, claimed to have once received a letter reporting that "the French had caught the contagion of Byronism to the highest pitch" (qtd.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge esteemed Dante's "combination of poetry with doctrine, which is one of the characteristics of Christian poetry." Thomas Carlyle pronounced Dante "world-deep" and deplored the Romantic vogue for the Inferno at the expense of the other canticles, attributing it to "our general Byronism of taste, [which] is like to be a transient feeling." (It was not, at least where the Inferno is concerned.) And the arch-Romantic Percy Bysshe Shelley also defied the taste of his age, and of our own, declaring the Purgatorio superior to the Inferno and the Paradiso most excellent of all.
Swinburne might be considered the embodiment of two different elements of British Philhellenism: the legacy of early-nineteenth century Byronism and the advocacy of liberal principles.
However, during the Easter of 1824, when he died at Missolonghi, one resurrection, that is empirically verifiable, did take place: "that monster known as Byronism" rose from Byron's corpse and began to live a life of its own (Eisler 752).
He was caricatured as a dandy in contemporary circles, who according to Daniels and O'Kane combined "louche Tory Byronism with the volubility of the aristocratic stage Irishman!" (42).
He has taught courses in English and European Romanticism, Byron and Byronism, Keats and His Circle, Children's Literature, and C.S.
The Female Romantics: Nineteenth-Century Women Novelists and Byronism. New York: Routledge, 2013.
The most recent of Routledge's series Studies in Romanticism is Caroline Franklin's 2013 The Female Romantics: Nineteenth-century Women Novelists and Byronism. Franklin's study focuses on the works of female travel writers like Madame de Stael and Lady Morgan; contemporary female novelists like Mary Shelley, Lady Caroline Lamb, George Sand, and Jane Austen; and, from the generation of female writers that followed the poet's life, Anne and Charlotte Bronte and Harriet Beecher Stowe.
It coincides with Dostoevsky's conviction that the 'evil' represented by figures like Stavrogin was imported into Russia along with the cult of Byronism during the 1820s.
Nevertheless, there can be no doubt that the example of certain Byronic heroes, in addition to influencing the way in which Octave desponds and despairs generally, also suggested how he might adjust to his hidden sexual problem: the suppressed violence, the solitariness, the glacial reserve, and the contempt for and resistance to love which characterize these heroes were so many Romantic trappings in which it was all too easy for Stendhal to veil Octave's malady (Rosa, "Byronism" 799-805).
The later version of the scene--moonlit, crepuscular, gauzy--is moody almost to the point of Byronism. It echoes, in fact, certain lines from The Corsair (1814):