Byronism


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Related to Byronism: cronyism, Byronic hero

Byronism

the characteristics of the poetry and writings of George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824).
See also: Literary Style
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Thomas Carlyle pronounced Dante "world-deep" and deplored the Romantic vogue for the Inferno at the expense of the other canticles, attributing it to "our general Byronism of taste, [which] is like to be a transient feeling.
Swinburne might be considered the embodiment of two different elements of British Philhellenism: the legacy of early-nineteenth century Byronism and the advocacy of liberal principles.
The phenomenon of Byronism that had already existed during his life, now increased, and very soon new Byrons appeared.
He was caricatured as a dandy in contemporary circles, who according to Daniels and O'Kane combined "louche Tory Byronism with the volubility of the aristocratic stage Irishman
He has taught courses in English and European Romanticism, Byron and Byronism, Keats and His Circle, Children's Literature, and C.
The Female Romantics: Nineteenth-Century Women Novelists and Byronism.
In terms of her methodology, Franklin is predominately a New Historicist / Cultural Materialist, weaving together large-scale cultural studies and history with literary criticism, a common but useful and almost necessary choice when addressing Byron and Byronism as cultural touchstones, which undoubtedly they were.
It coincides with Dostoevsky's conviction that the 'evil' represented by figures like Stavrogin was imported into Russia along with the cult of Byronism during the 1820s.
Divided into three parts, the book examines, first, two female writers' engagements with the male poetic tradition, next, the close and mutually formative interactions of William and Dorothy Wordsworth as siblings and writers, and last, the infatuations, disenchantments, recriminations, rebuttals, apologies, and celebrity apotheoses of Byronism in the aftermath of "the Separation," before and after Lord Byron's death.
But his Byronism requires that he part from his wife and sail away to die in Greece, however incongruous and inadequate his motives for doing so may be.
The later version of the scene--moonlit, crepuscular, gauzy--is moody almost to the point of Byronism.
Since this dose is higher than those calculated for hesperidins present in the Cameo, it is probably that the sedative effect of Byronism cras-sifolio was not observed.