Byzantine Empire


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Byzantine Empire

also Eastern Empire
An empire of the eastern Mediterranean region, dating from ad 395 when the Roman Empire was partitioned into eastern and western portions. Its extent varied greatly over the centuries, but its core remained the Balkan Peninsula and Asia Minor. The empire collapsed when its capital, Constantinople, fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.

Byzantine Empire

n
(Historical Terms) the continuation of the Roman Empire in the East, esp after the deposition of the last emperor in Rome (476 ad). It was finally extinguished by the fall of Constantinople, its capital, in 1453. See also Eastern Roman Empire

Byz′antine Em′pire


n.
the Eastern Roman Empire after the fall of the Western Empire in a.d. 476: became extinct after the fall of Constantinople, its capital, in 1453.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Byzantine Empire - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395Byzantine Empire - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395
Roman Empire - an empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the eastern or Byzantine Empire; at its peak lands in Europe and Africa and Asia were ruled by ancient Rome
Byzantium - an ancient city on the Bosporus founded by the Greeks; site of modern Istanbul; in 330 Constantine I rebuilt the city and called it Constantinople and made it his capital
Byzantine - a native or inhabitant of Byzantium or of the Byzantine Empire
References in classic literature ?
Even very clever people cannot tell the exact date at which the Roman Empire came to an end and the Greek or Byzantine Empire, as it is called, began.
For hundred of year the Byzantine Empire stood as a barrier against the Saracen hosts of Asia.
They settled Iceland and Greenland and prematurely discovered America; they established themselves as the ruling aristocracy in Russia, and as the imperial body-guard and chief bulwark of the Byzantine empire at Constantinople; and in the eleventh century they conquered southern Italy and Sicily, whence in the first crusade they pressed on with unabated vigor to Asia Minor.
According to Stern, during these centuries, Acre - in addition to being the gateway for Christian pilgrims into the Land of Israel, was one of the busiest commercial ports in the Latin East that had commercial links to Europe, the Islamic world and the Byzantine Empire.
By the mid-eighth century, Arab armies had subjugated the Persian Empire, drastically reduced the size of the Byzantine Empire, and eliminated the Visigoth kingdom of Spain.
An excellent reference, as is James Allan Evans' THE EMPEROR JUSTINIAN AND THE BYZANTINE EMPIRE (0313326820, $45.
Mango writes in his Preface, the Byzantine Empire, which was once regarded by Gibbon 'as superstition' has now 'emerged as spirituality'.
In the Byzantine empire, the corporate symbols of religion were the corporate symbols of society.
The approach was adopted throughout the Christian world during the Byzantine Empire and has its roots in the wax-painted grave masks of late Pharaonic Egypt.
From a tiny base in a lonely quarter of Istanbul, in the face of some harassment from politically conservative Muslims, Bartholomew keeps alive the historic see that was known as Constantinople when it was the capital of the great Byzantine Empire.
In the Kitab al-buldan, a large part of which is lost, al-Ya`qubi analyzes statistics, topography, and taxation in describing the larger cities of Iraq, Iran, Arabia, Syria, Egypt, the Maghreb, India, China, and the Byzantine Empire.
The Byzantine Empire, now under Alexius I Comnenus, who reigned from 1081 to 1118, was under attack not only by the Turks from the east but by the Normans from the west and appealed to the Western powers for help.