Byzantine Empire

(redirected from Byzantine Empire, The)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Byzantine Empire

also Eastern Empire
An empire of the eastern Mediterranean region, dating from ad 395 when the Roman Empire was partitioned into eastern and western portions. Its extent varied greatly over the centuries, but its core remained the Balkan Peninsula and Asia Minor. The empire collapsed when its capital, Constantinople, fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.

Byzantine Empire

n
(Historical Terms) the continuation of the Roman Empire in the East, esp after the deposition of the last emperor in Rome (476 ad). It was finally extinguished by the fall of Constantinople, its capital, in 1453. See also Eastern Roman Empire

Byz′antine Em′pire


n.
the Eastern Roman Empire after the fall of the Western Empire in a.d. 476: became extinct after the fall of Constantinople, its capital, in 1453.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Byzantine Empire - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395Byzantine Empire - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395
Roman Empire - an empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the eastern or Byzantine Empire; at its peak lands in Europe and Africa and Asia were ruled by ancient Rome
Byzantium - an ancient city on the Bosporus founded by the Greeks; site of modern Istanbul; in 330 Constantine I rebuilt the city and called it Constantinople and made it his capital
Byzantine - a native or inhabitant of Byzantium or of the Byzantine Empire
References in periodicals archive ?
Introducing his comprehensive study of child welfare in the Byzantine empire, the author quotes Anna Comnena on three twelfth-century strategies for the care of orphans: supervision by adult relatives, installment in monasteries, and enrollment in orphanages.
In the Byzantine empire, the corporate symbols of religion were the corporate symbols of society.
After the conquest of Constantinople by the Muslims in 1453 and the collapse of the Byzantine empire, the Orthodox Church in Greece was faced with a hostile religious, administrative and social system.