Byzantine Empire

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Byzantine Empire

also Eastern Empire
An empire of the eastern Mediterranean region, dating from ad 395 when the Roman Empire was partitioned into eastern and western portions. Its extent varied greatly over the centuries, but its core remained the Balkan Peninsula and Asia Minor. The empire collapsed when its capital, Constantinople, fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.

Byzantine Empire

n
(Historical Terms) the continuation of the Roman Empire in the East, esp after the deposition of the last emperor in Rome (476 ad). It was finally extinguished by the fall of Constantinople, its capital, in 1453. See also Eastern Roman Empire

Byz′antine Em′pire


n.
the Eastern Roman Empire after the fall of the Western Empire in a.d. 476: became extinct after the fall of Constantinople, its capital, in 1453.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Byzantine Empire - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395Byzantine Empire - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395
Roman Empire - an empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the eastern or Byzantine Empire; at its peak lands in Europe and Africa and Asia were ruled by ancient Rome
Byzantium - an ancient city on the Bosporus founded by the Greeks; site of modern Istanbul; in 330 Constantine I rebuilt the city and called it Constantinople and made it his capital
Byzantine - a native or inhabitant of Byzantium or of the Byzantine Empire
References in periodicals archive ?
The relatively smaller city is considered an open-air museum of Byzantine history, and offers a unique cultural experience for everyone.
The relatively small city is considered an open-air museum of Byzantine history, and offers a truly unique cultural experience for everyone.
In addition to providing a badly needed narrative of this critical period of Byzantine history.
Byzantine history, for example, was critical for Venetian historians and their articulation of the myth of Venice, and the author missed an opportunity to demonstrate how the translatio narratives influenced later historical narratives.
Addressing the event, Cypriot municipal councillor Petros Sarris, a Byzantine history professor, recalled the circumstances that brought Pippas to the United Kingdom, censuring the 1974 Turkish invasion and occupation of Cyprus.
Sahner first arrived in the country in 2008, a student of early Islamic and Byzantine history, driven by the realization that the Arabic language was an essential tool for his academic career.
yznik was the setting for major events in Byzantine history for another century.
But in his eagerness to argue against the conventional theocratic reading of Byzantine history, he errs in the opposite direction toward an essentially secular reading.
Among the latter one could find names such as Aksiniya Dzurova, daughter of the Communist Defense Minister, Dobri Dzurov, expert in Byzantine history and a known collaborator of military intelligence.
In fact, he never touches this period, evidently considering it unrepresentative of Byzantine history and culture --an attitude unfortunately found among many Byzantinists.
Of all the figures in Byzantine history, the Emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus is perhaps one of the most intriguing.
As example, Semavi Eyice's "Turkiye'de Bizans Sanati Arastirmalari ve Istanbul Universitesinde Bizans Sanati" ["Studies on Byzantine Art in Turkey and Byzantine Art in Istanbul University"] published in 1973 is a leading study providing a vast bibliography for studies in Byzantine history, art history and archaeology from the late 19th century to the 1970s.