Eastern Orthodox Church

(redirected from Byzantine religion)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

Eastern Orthodox Church

n.
The body of modern churches, including among others the Greek and Russian Orthodox, that is derived from the church of the Byzantine Empire, adheres to the Byzantine rite, and acknowledges the honorary primacy of the patriarch of Constantinople.

Eastern Orthodox adj.

Eastern Orthodox Church

n
(Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) another name for the Orthodox Church

Or′thodox Church′


n.
1. the Christian church comprising the local and national Eastern churches that are in communion with the ecumenical patriarch of Constantinople; Byzantine Church.
2. (orig.) the Christian church of those countries formerly comprising the Eastern Roman Empire and of countries evangelized from it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Eastern Orthodox Church - derived from the Byzantine Church and adhering to Byzantine ritesEastern Orthodox Church - derived from the Byzantine Church and adhering to Byzantine rites
canonisation, canonization - (Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church) the act of admitting a deceased person into the canon of saints
Catholic Church - any of several churches claiming to have maintained historical continuity with the original Christian Church
Greek Church, Greek Orthodox Church - state church of Greece; an autonomous part of the Eastern Orthodox Church
Russian Orthodox Church - an independent church with its own Patriarch; until 1917 it was the established church or Russia
bishop - a senior member of the Christian clergy having spiritual and administrative authority; appointed in Christian churches to oversee priests or ministers; considered in some churches to be successors of the twelve Apostles of Christ
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholars of Byzantine religion, literature, and culture explore women; icons and images; and texts, practices, and spaces.
For visitors unfamiliar with Byzantine religion and iconography, the majority of the labels offer no helpful dues.
Her comparison of the proscriptive sources (Clement of Alexandria and John Chrysostom) with descriptions of liturgical experience employs close readings of both texts and contexts, so that the use of the senses becomes central to the interpretation of Byzantine religion.