Istanbul

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Is·tan·bul

 (ĭs′tăn-bo͞ol′, -tän-, ĭ-stän′bo͝ol) Formerly Con·stan·ti·no·ple (kŏn′stăn-tə-nō′pəl)
The largest city of Turkey, in the northwest part of the country on both sides of the Bosporus at its entrance into the Sea of Marmara. Founded c. 660 bc as Byzantium, it was refounded in ad 330 by Constantine the Great, and under the name Constantinople it became the capital of the Eastern Roman, or Byzantine, Empire. The city was sacked by Crusaders in 1204 and taken by the Turks in 1453. Istanbul was chosen as the official name in 1930.

Istanbul

(ˌɪstænˈbuːl)
n
(Placename) a port in NW Turkey, on the western (European) shore of the Bosporus: the largest city in Turkey; founded in about 660 bc by Greeks; refounded by Constantine the Great in 330 ad as the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire; taken by the Turks in 1453 and remained capital of the Ottoman Empire until 1922; industrial centre for shipbuilding, textiles, etc. Pop: 9 760 000 (2005 est). Ancient name: Byzantium Former name (330–1926): Constantinople

Is•tan•bul

(ˈɪs tɑnˌbʊl, -tæn-, -tɑm-)

n.
a seaport in NW Turkey, on both sides of the Bosporus: site of capital of Byzantine and Ottoman empires. 7,615,500. Formerly (a. d. 330–1930), Constantinople.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Istanbul - the largest city and former capital of TurkeyIstanbul - the largest city and former capital of Turkey; rebuilt on the site of ancient Byzantium by Constantine I in the fourth century; renamed Constantinople by Constantine who made it the capital of the Byzantine Empire; now the seat of the Eastern Orthodox Church
Bosporus Bridge - a suspension bridge across the Bosporus at Istanbul
Hagia Sofia, Hagia Sophia, Santa Sofia, Santa Sophia - a 6th century masterpiece of Byzantine architecture in Istanbul; built as a Christian church, converted to a mosque in 1453, and made into a museum in the middle of the 20th century
Republic of Turkey, Turkey - a Eurasian republic in Asia Minor and the Balkans; on the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in 1918, the Young Turks, led by Kemal Ataturk, established a republic in 1923
Chalcedon, Kadikoy - a former town on the Bosporus (now part of Istanbul); site of the Council of Chalcedon
Translations
İstanbul
استانبول
Istanbul
CarigradIstanbul
Isztambul
IstambułStambuł
Istanbul
Istanbul
CarigradIstanbulKonstantinopoljИстанбулКонстантинопољ
İstanbul
Стамбул

Istanbul

[ˈɪstænˈbuːl] NEstambul m

Istanbul

[ˌɪstænˈbuːl] nIstanbul

Istanbul

nIstanbul nt

Istanbul

[ˌɪstænˈbuːl] nIstanbul f
References in classic literature ?
Edison greatly improved it by using soft carbon instead of a steel point.
The diamond is contained in the carbon, gold is in the fire.
He was in consumption, as so many were in that region, and he carbonized against it, as he said; he took his carbon in the liquid form, and the last time I saw him the carbon had finally prevailed over the consumption, but it had itself become a seated vice; that was many years since, and it is many years since he died.
So long as the excess of carbon dioxide in the blood was not sufficient to prevent heart action, the rykor would suffer only a diminution of vitality; but would still respond to the exciting agency of the kaldane's brain.
How to get rid of our excessive carbon dioxide without unduly wasting our oxygen is a delicate and vital question," said Challenger, looking round him after the five iron tubes had been laid side by side against the wall.
My dear, the passengers on that train were no more animate than the coals into which they crashed or the carbon which they have now become," said Challenger, stroking her hand soothingly.
Martin gathered together a number of carbon copies of his short stories, hesitated a moment, then added his "Sea Lyrics.
The mush was half cooked and mostly burnt, the bacon was charred carbon, and the coffee was unspeakable.
If I were a chemist, I would tell him that the aerolites, bodies evidently formed exteriorly of our terrestrial globe, have, upon analysis, revealed indisputable traces of carbon, a substance which owes its origin solely to organized beings, and which, according to the experiments of Reichenbach, must necessarily itself have been endued with animation.
Dass du so gross warst, Dass du verdunkeltest einst, Machtige, Rom und Byzanz, Frommt es dem Enkel?
Das alte Prinzip der Anpassung der Kirche an den Staat hat Byzanz uberlebt und ist an die nationalen Kirchen der Moderne ubergegangen.
On Byzantine succession, see Peter Schreiner, Byzanz 565-1453 (Munich: Oldenbourg, 2008), 75-77.