Clostridium difficile

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Clostridium difficile

(dɪˈfɪsɪli; ˌdɪfɪˈsiːl)
n
(Pathology) a faecal organism endemic in hospitals and responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired cases of diarrhoea in elderly patients. Sometimes shortened to: C.difficile or C.diff
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of detecting and isolating Clostridium difficile carriers at hospital admission on the incidence of C difficile infections: a quasi-experimental controlled study.
Increasing the number of culture method replicates may yield higher rates of C difficile in vegetables as it has been shown to increase the ability to detect C.
"Ironically, even antibiotics used to treat C difficile, such as metronidazole (Flagyl) and vancomycin (Vancocin), have been rarely reported to cause C.
M2 EQUITYBITES-March 28, 2012-Quidel Corporation gets CE Mark for AmpliVue C difficile assay for Clostridium difficile(C)2012 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
The new polymerase chain reaction(PCR) testing is more sensitive and able to pick up C difficile far more accurately.
Recently updated guidelines from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America define CDI as the presence of diarrhea ([greater than or equal to] 3 unformed stools in 24 hours) and either a positive stool test for toxigenic C difficile or its toxins or colonoscopic or histopathologic findings demonstrating pseudomembranous colitis.
Other factors related to increased risk of C difficile infection include greater severity of the underlying disease, increased age, extended use of a nasogastric tube, and gastrointestinal procedures and surgeries (McMaster-Baxter & Musher, 2007).
Pay or no pay, doctors should be aware of research showing that treatment with various probiotic agents can markedly reduce the incidence of C difficile infections and reduce the recurrence rate in patients who have previously been infected.
Colleen Clarke, of Linthorpe believes her mother, Catherine Pamela Jones, 78, of Middlesbrough, would be alive if she had not suffered from C Difficile and MRSA at the James Cook University Hospital.
Between 2004 and 2005, mention of MRSA on death certificates rose by 39% while mention of C difficile rose 69%, according to figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS).
difficile agar and C difficile supplement SR0096; Oxoid, Columbia, MD, USA) that was incubated anaerobically at 37[degrees]C for 7 days.
See Table 2 for most frequently used antibiotics which are believed to be linked to C difficile infection (Pepin et al., 2005; Wilcox, 2003)