C rations

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C rations

or

C-rations

pl n
(Military) tinned food formerly issued in packs to US soldiers
[C20: C(ombat) rations]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
And another wrote: "I would love to pay a fortune to live in submarine like conditions and eat c-rations and powdered eggs for what could be eternity.
We had been eating C-rations since the landing, but usually only had time for one meal, so I gathered all the unused meals, plus some Ks and Ds [daily and emergency rations] left over and gave them to my host.
How many nonsmokers received the cigarettes in C-rations yet never developed the habit?
In the line I devoured my C-rations with various degrees of relish.
While the NVA troops survive on rice and political fervor, the marines move about sick with fatigue, choking down foul, chemically laced water, and cramming down C-rations.
Often we had nothing to eat but C-rations out of a can.
A journey that takes place in the Central Highlands of Vietnam, from living in muddy-foxholes with snakes and insects and eating C-Rations, to working in an air conditioned diner, sipping wine and eating filet mignon."
Chow halls, C-rations, or Meals-Ready-to-Eat (MREs) were in my future once I eventually settled at Leatherneck, so I searched for something different while I still had the chance.
Over the months LeOna morphs from a naive Minnesota girl to a seasoned and worldly young woman experienced enough, by the time she landed in Algeria, to barter her C-rations for coffee, bread, cheese, and sausages and, later on, talk a knife-wielding soldier out of killing another soldier.
C-rations ran dangerously low and the cans were frozen solid.
Before he established himself in the electronic design community, Alix was digging foxholes, eating C-rations, and spying on the ruskies.
The process of storing food in cans led to the "Type C Ration," or c-rations as the canned meals were called by American soldiers.