computed tomography

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computed tomography

n. Abbr. CT
Tomography in which computer analysis of a series of x-ray scans made of a bodily structure or tissue is used to construct a three-dimensional image of that structure. The technique is used in diagnostic studies of internal bodily structures, as in the detection of tumors or brain aneurysms.

computed tomography

n
(Medicine) med another name (esp US) for computerized tomography
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.computed tomography - a method of examining body organs by scanning them with X rays and using a computer to construct a series of cross-sectional scans along a single axis
X-raying, X-radiation - obtaining images by the use of X rays
Translations
počítačová tomografievýpočetní tomografie
References in periodicals archive ?
But there are not that many primate CAT scans about.
When cardiac CAT scans are used during an emergency situation, they can provide critical diagnostic information about coronary blood flow that can help save a patient's life.
That must be reassuring to the 697 vets who had MRIs and CAT scans at Sepulveda in the first six months of this year.
Jeff suffered a linear separation in his aorta, a condition revealed by CAT scans at a Long Beach, Calif.
The second file would be secure and might contain the patient's entire medical history, including imaging data such as radiology results, X-rays, and MRI and CAT scans," he added.
Here's hoping that CAT scans can help dogs in the future.
Repeated CAT scans, clinical symptoms, and serial C-reactive protein levels indicated rapid regression of the abscess followed by complete cure.
In 1984 this was state-of-the-art medicine in Canada because there were at that time something like, I think, five CAT scans in the Province of Ontario.
Wireless equipment is difficult to use in hospitals because its radio frequency interferes with intravenal pumps, CAT scans and heart monitoring equipment.
Doctors use CAT scans to look at cross-sections of a patient's body to search for abnormalities like tumors.
Using a second computer procedure, the microscope scans many focal planes and builds a three-dimensional image of the object, much as CAT scans do.
Based on the same technology used in hospital CAT scans, computed tomography makes it possible to see inside metal objects without destroying them.