unconventional warfare

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unconventional warfare

A broad spectrum of military and paramilitary operations, normally of long duration, predominantly conducted through, with, or by indigenous or surrogate forces who are organized, trained, equipped, supported, and directed in varying degrees by an external source. It includes, but is not limited to, guerrilla warfare, subversion, sabotage, intelligence activities, and unconventional assisted recovery. Also called UW.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
VLSTRACK (Vapor, Liquid, and Solid Tracking Model) models the diffusion and transport of a CB agent cloud.
The Army Technical Escort Unit often is called upon to evaluate discovered devices or CB agent materials.
By determining the quantity of CB agent necessary to produce an effect threat and by understanding potential enemy doctrine and battlefield constraints, it may be possible to estimate the area and the number of targets that could be impacted by an emerging CB arsenal.
The costs of procuring additional protective ensembles and medical pre- and post-treatments for hundreds of thousands of DOD and other-than-U.S.-forces personnel will be immense (not to mention additional CB agent detectors, decontaminants, and collective protection systems for every military base that perceives a terrorist CB threat).
The mask must fit properly to perform the intended mission and to protect the warfighter from the hazards associated with exposure to CB agents, toxic industrial chemicals, and toxic industrial materials.
The JSF decontamination system is composed of an air beam shelter (with an incorporated CB containment liner structure) and an integrated decontaminant delivery system, providing hot air decontamination and biothermal decontamination capabilities for decontaminating CB agents, respectively.
One tack the author takes to prove his point is noting that CB agents are in many cases merely incapacitants and, therefore, "safer" than conventional weapons; i.e., less likely to result in serious collateral casualties.