CITES


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cite

 (sīt)
v. cit·ed, cit·ing, cites
v.tr.
1.
a. To quote or refer to (a book or author, for example) as an authority or example in making an argument.
b. Law To refer to (a previous court decision or other legal precedent), as when arguing a case.
2. To mention or bring forward as support, illustration, or proof: cited several instances of insubordinate behavior.
3.
a. To commend officially for meritorious action in military service.
b. To honor formally.
4. To issue a notice of violation to: was cited by the police for jaywalking.
v.intr. Law
To make reference to a previous court decision. Often used with to: The lower court cited to the Supreme Court decision issued last year.
n. Informal
A citation or quotation.

[Middle English citen, to summon, from Old French citer, from Latin citāre; see keiə- in Indo-European roots.]

cit′a·ble adj.

CITES

abbreviation for
(Environmental Science) Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
References in classic literature ?
But though they should be so, they are not sufficient for our purpose, without a good share of learning; for which I could again cite the authority of Horace, and of many others, if any was necessary to prove that tools are of no service to a workman, when they are not sharpened by art, or when he wants rules to direct him in his work, or hath no matter to work upon.
Though the Barrister tried to appeal to its pride, And vainly proceeded to cite A number of cases, in which making laces Had been proved an infringement of right.
I shall never hesitate to cite Cesare Borgia and his actions.
Grant it, since you cite it; but, say what you will, there is no real dignity in whaling.
Namibia's deliberation to leave CITES follows after its proposals to allow for hunting and trade of the southern white rhino and its products as well as to be allowed a one-time sale of government-owned ivory stockpiles was rejected at just-ended conference in Geneva, Switzerland.
'Humanity needs to respond to the growing extinction crisis by transforming the way we manage the world's wild animals and plants,' CITES Secretary-General Ivonne Higuero said.
Governments have submitted 56 new proposals to change the levels of protection that CITES provides for species of wild animals and plants that are in international trade, a release from CITES stated.
Governments have submitted 56 new proposals to change levels of protection that CITES provides for species of wild animals and plants in international trade, to be considered during the 18th meeting of the Conference of the Parties of CITES (CoP18), CITES stated in a press release.
"The CITES Secretariat does not issue CITES permits or certificates, and has no authority to directly intervene in any trade transactions," CITES wrote in a December 2014 statement published to its website.
The airline's existing ban on carrying CITES I hunting trophies has been extended to include all species included in the CITES I, II and III.