cosmic microwave background radiation

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cosmic microwave background radiation

n.
Microwave radiation that penetrates space throughout the universe, postulated to be residual electromagnetic radiation originally emitted by warm matter in the universe approximately 400,000 years after the Big Bang. Also called cosmic background radiation, cosmic microwave background, microwave background.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmic microwave background radiation - (cosmology) the cooled remnant of the hot big bang that fills the entire universe and can be observed today with an average temperature of about 2.725 kelvin
cosmogeny, cosmogony, cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
cosmic radiation - radiation coming from outside the solar system
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although invisible to our eyes, CMB radiation falls into the television transmission region of the spectrum and contributes to the static snow seen between "The Simpsons" and "Judge Judy."
The remaining region, where the CMB radiation is not scattered by the hot gas, appears blue.
As the electrons in the jet fly from the black hole at close to the speed of light, they move through the sea of CMB radiation and collide with microwave photons, boosting the energy of the photons up into the X-ray band to be detected by Chandra.
Like polarized light (which vibrates in one direction and is produced by the scattering of visible light off the surface of the ocean, for example), the polarized "B-mode" microwaves the scientists discovered were produced when CMB radiation from the early universe scattered off electrons 380,000 years after the Big Bang, when the cosmos cooled enough to allow protons and electrons to combine into atoms.
During its journey across the cosmos, some of the CMB radiation traveled too close to the universe's cosmic web of dark matter and galaxy clusters, and the gravity of those objects acted as a lens, bending the photons' paths.
As cooling started, the protons and electrons fused to form hydrogen, and photons or light particles were set free-the "first light" we now see as CMB radiation. As the Universe expanded, these light waves stretched out into shorter microwave wavelengths, reaching a temperature today of just 2.7 degrees above absolute zero-minus 273.15 C (minus 459.67 F).
In the new study, the team estimated the motion of each cluster with respect to the CMB radiation, which is believed to be "the ultimate reference" of movement on a cosmological scale, says Ebeling, a coauthor of the new papers.
Subsequent chapters describe scalar perturbations, the anisotropy spectrum of the CMB radiation, dilaton phenomenology, and elements of brane cosmology.
In the CMB radiation, they noticed a cold spot that was especially cold.