cytomegalovirus

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cy·to·meg·a·lo·vi·rus

 (sī′tə-mĕg′ə-lō-vī′rəs)
n. Abbr. CMV
Any of a group of herpesviruses that attack and enlarge epithelial cells. Such viruses also cause a disease of infants characterized by circulatory dysfunction and microcephaly.

cytomegalovirus

(ˌsaɪtəʊˈmɛɡələʊˌvaɪrəs)
n
(Microbiology) a virus of the herpes virus family that may cause serious disease in patients whose immune systems are compromised. Abbreviation: CMV

cy•to•meg•a•lo•vi•rus

(ˌsaɪ toʊˌmɛg ə loʊˈvaɪ rəs)

n., pl. -rus•es.
a herpesvirus that produces abnormal enlargement of epithelial cells, usu. mildly infectious but a cause of pneumonia in immunodeficient persons and severe systemic damage in the newborn.
[1960–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cytomegalovirus - any of a group of herpes viruses that enlarge epithelial cells and can cause birth defects; can affect humans with impaired immunological systems
herpes virus - any of the animal viruses that cause painful blisters on the skin
Translations

cy·to·meg·a·lo·vi·rus

n. citomegalovirus, grupo de virus pertenecientes a la familia Herpesviridae que infectan humanos y otros animales, y son causantes de la enfermedad de inclusión citomegálica.

cytomegalovirus (CMV)

n citomegalovirus m (CMV)
References in periodicals archive ?
CMV infection has led to the development of diagnostic procedures for the rapid identification of CMV disease and infants with congenital infection.
Studies of children with symptomatic central nervous system congenital CMV disease provide evidence of improvement (or lack of progression) in hearing loss in those treated with valganciclovir.
Even if they get the recommended 100 days of prophylaxis immediately following the diagnosis, 50 per cent still have CMV recorded in the blood following that and 36pc go on to suffer from CMV disease.
(9) In more severe cases of immunosuppression CMV disease can present as Guillain-Barre syndrome, myocarditis, thrombocytopenia, or meningoencephalitis.
The above-mentioned 82 patients coinfected with CMV included those with CMV viremia without definitive evidence of CMV gut involvement as well as those with CMV disease of the gut.
CMV infection is defined as the virus detection in blood without clinical symptoms, but CMV disease is viremia with clinical symptoms ranging from mononucleosis-like viral syndrome to less common tissue-invasive disease [11, 12].
In AIDS patients, extraocular CMV disease seems to be a strong predisposing factor for developing CMV retinitis.
Clinically significant CMV disease is typically seen in profound immunocompromised state such as in AIDS and bone marrow transplant patients.
A healthy immune system typically protects an infected person against CMV disease, but does not prevent or clear latent infection.
[10] However, as CMV retinitis is asymptomatic in almost half of affected patients in the early stages of disease, [11] routine screening fundoscopy for those at high risk of CMV disease by a trained clinician, not necessarily an ophthalmologist, is necessary.
International guidelines reported that CD4 cell level is less predictive of risk for CMV disease in young infants with HIV, and CMV infection can occur in HIV-infected children with higher CD4 counts.
The pathogenesis is related to specific drugs, especially aromatic anticonvulsants, altered immune response, sequential reactivation of the human herpesviruses, and association with human leukocyte antigen alleles.[sup][2] The human herpesviruses reactivation such as human herpesvirus (HHV)-6, HHV-7, EBV, and CMV reactivation may stimulate proliferation of both viral-specific and nonspecific CD4 and CD8 T-cells, triggering massive cytokine release, and causing a hypersensitivity reaction.[sup][11] CMV disease is usually seen in immunocompromised patients with HIV infection or postorgan transplantation under immunosuppressant.