comer

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com·er

 (kŭm′ər)
n.
1. One that arrives or comes: free food for all comers.
2. One showing promise of attaining success: a political comer.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

comer

(ˈkʌmə)
n
1. (in combination) a person who comes: all-comers; newcomers.
2. informal a potential success
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

com•er

(ˈkʌm ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that is progressing well or is very promising.
2. a person or thing that arrives.
[1325–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comer - someone with a promising future
challenger, competitor, contender, rival, competition - the contestant you hope to defeat; "he had respect for his rivals"; "he wanted to know what the competition was doing"
2.comer - someone who arrives (or has arrived)comer - someone who arrives (or has arrived)
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
early bird - a person who arrives early before others do
latecomer - someone who arrives late
newcomer - a recent arrival; "he's a newcomer to Boston"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

comer

noun
1. One that arrives:
2. One showing much promise:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
آتِ، قادِم، وافِد
příchozí
deltagerdender kommer
érkezõ
komumaîur, sá sem kemur
prichádzajúci
gelen kişikatılan kimse

comer

[ˈkʌməʳ] N the first comerel primero/la primera en llegar
he has defended his title against all comersha defendido su título contra todos los contendientes
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

comer

[ˈkʌmər] narrivant(e) m/f
see also latecomer, newcomer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

comer

n this competition is open to all comersan diesem Wettbewerb kann sich jeder beteiligen; “open to all comers”Teilnahme für jedermann“
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

comer

[ˈkʌməʳ] n open to all comersaperto/a a tutti
the first comer → il/la primo/a venuto/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

come

(kam) past tense came (keim) past participle come verb
1. to move etc towards the person speaking or writing, or towards the place being referred to by him. Come here!; Are you coming to the dance?; John has come to see me; Have any letters come for me?
2. to become near or close to something in time or space. Christmas is coming soon.
3. to happen or be situated. The letter `d' comes between `c' and è' in the alphabet.
4. (often with to) to happen (by accident). How did you come to break your leg?
5. to arrive at (a certain state etc). What are things coming to? We have come to an agreement.
6. (with to) (of numbers, prices etc) to amount (to). The total comes to 51.
interjection
expressing disapproval, drawing attention etc. Come, come! That was very rude of you!
ˈcomer noun
late-comers will not be admitted; We welcome all comers.
ˈcoming noun
the comings and goings of the people in the street.
ˈcomeback noun
a return (especially to show business). The actress made a comeback years after retiring.
ˈcomedown noun
a fall in dignity etc. The smaller car was a bit of a comedown after the Rolls Royce.
come about
to happen. How did that come about?
come across
to meet or find by chance. He came across some old friends.
come along
1. to come with or accompany the person speaking etc. Come along with me!
2. to progress. How are things coming along?
come by
to get. How did you come by that black eye?
come down
to decrease; to become less. Tea has come down in price.
come into one's own
to have the opportunity of showing what one can do etc. He has at last come into his own as a pop-singer.
come off
1. to fall off. Her shoe came off.
2. to turn out (well); to succeed. The gamble didn't come off.
come on
1. to appear on stage or the screen. They waited for the comedian to come on.
2. hurry up!. Come on – we'll be late for the party!
3. don't be ridiculous!. Come on, you don't really expect me to believe that!
come out
1. to become known. The truth finally came out.
2. to be published. This newspaper comes out once a week.
3. to strike. The men have come out (on strike).
4. (of a photograph) to be developed. This photograph has come out very well.
5. to be removed. This dirty mark won't come out.
come round
1. (also come around) to visit. Come round and see us soon.
2. to regain consciousness. After receiving anesthesia, don't expect to come round for at least twenty minutes.
come to
to regain consciousness. When will he come to after the operation?
come to light
to be discovered. The theft only came to light when the owners returned from holiday.
come upon
to meet, find or discover by chance. She came upon a solution to the problem.
come up with
to think of; to produce. He's come up with a great idea.
come what may
whatever happens. I'll give you my support, come what may!
to come
(in the) future. in the days to come.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paseo Comida's comedor is done in dark brown and beige, with antique-looking lamps hanging from the high ceiling.
qual a comida e a refeicao em comum ocupa um papel central no culto,