CSCE


Also found in: Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

CSCE

abbreviation for
(Military) (formerly) Conference for Security and Cooperation in Europe
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
On 13 November 1989 a "Draft Law on the Procedure for Soviet Citizens' Exit From and Entry Into the Soviet Union" was presented to the Supreme Soviet by Anatoli Kovalev, USSR First Deputy Foreign Minister.(63) The law was designed to make Soviet legislation consistent with the requirements of the CSCE Vienna Final Document.
CSCE became the vehicle for forcing the Soviet Union under Mikhail Gorbachev into a program of liberalization, which ultimately led to its downfall.
A bigger EU, enlarged by perhaps nine members, would work through NATO and the CSCE to bring in the Russian-led CIS as an equal partner in Europe.
According to a delegation of the CSCE, of which Kazakhstan is a member, the poll failed to meet democratic standards.
The Helsinki Accords is the Final Act of the CSCE held in 1975.
The UN Charter, the Friendly Relations Declaration and the CSCE Final Act of 1975 were drawn upon to support this position.
Several Asia-Pacific leaders, from Kim Dae Jung to Gareth Evans, and many scholars as well have proposed turning the Six Party Talks into a kind of CSCE, the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.
Lessons learned within the CSCE process can indeed provide useful points of departure in the Middle East and North Africa.
In his September 1975 retrospect, the Ambassador to Moscow, Sir Terence Garvey, acknowledged that the very calling of a Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe (CSCE) was a triumph for the Soviets, who had first suggested this kind of meeting in the mid-1950s.
Not a few European and American scholars point to the dangers of a regional arms race, the prospects of a resurgent and aggressive China, and the consequences of the failure of the region to develop multilateral security mechanisms along the lines of CSCE or NATO.
At one point, for example, we are told that Yugoslavia shows the need for "a CSCE norm-setting institution" and that the CSCE "has failed to galvanize the political will need to shake governments out of their traditional ways of thinking" (p.