Caburn

Cab´urn


n.1.(Naut.) A small line made of spun yarn, to bind or worm cables, seize tackles, etc.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tracey Caburn returned from Tunisia with her mother, Maureen Sudmore, and sister, Debbie Murphy, from Pontefract.
At Manchester airport, Tracey Caburn, from Pontefract, Yorkshire, had returned with her mother, Maureen Sudmore and sister Debbie Murphy.
Tracey Caburn returned from Tunisia with her mother, Maureen Sudmore and sister Debbie Murphy, from Pontefract.
(20.) Caburn, Edward B: Haemorrhages in the Eye present at birth.
Bandera Partners and Caburn Management, who control approximately 22.5% and 2% of the company's outstanding shares, respectively, have agreed to tender all of their shares in the offer, according to the company.
Con respecto a esta dimension, traslado de representacion grafica a la simbolica, se siguieron las recomendaciones de Dickson et al (1991), al igual que Caburn (1974, citados por Dickson et al., 1991), pues ellos sugieren introducir la nocion de fracciones equivalentes, utilizando los constructos de area y conjunto, esto lo reafirman, Post et al.
The pilot, who is believed to have paraglided off nearby Mount Caburn, was not injured.
8 Quentin Bell writes that during the last months of her life Woolf would often take a break from writing Between the Acts: "In the intervals of writing she took pleasure in observing the landscape; she altered the position of her table in order to get a new aspect of the very beautiful flat country that lay between her and Mount Caburn" (460).