donor

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Related to Cadaveric Donor: cadaveric transplant

do·nor

 (dō′nər)
n.
1. One that contributes something, such as money, to a cause or fund.
2. Medicine An individual from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transfusion, implantation, or transplant.
3. Chemistry An atom, molecule, or ion that provides a part to combine with an acceptor, especially an atom that provides two electrons to form a bond with another atom.
4. Electronics An element introduced into a semiconductor with a negative valence greater than that of the pure semiconductor.
adj.
Medicine Used for transfusion, implantation, or transplant: a donor organ.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman donour, from Latin dōnātor, from dōnāre, to give; see donation.]

donor

(ˈdəʊnə)
n
1. a person who makes a donation
2. (Medicine) med any person who voluntarily gives blood, skin, a kidney, etc, for use in the treatment of another person
3. (Law) law
a. a person who makes a gift of property
b. a person who bestows upon another a power of appointment over property
4. (Chemistry) the atom supplying both electrons in a coordinate bond
5. (Electronics) an impurity, such as antimony or arsenic, that is added to a semiconductor material in order to increase its n-type conductivity by contributing free electrons. Compare acceptor2
[C15: from Old French doneur, from Latin dōnātor, from dōnāre to give]
ˈdonorˌship n

do•nor

(ˈdoʊ nər)

n.
1. a person who gives or donates.
2. a provider of blood, an organ, or other biological tissue for transfusion or transplantation.
3. an atom that provides a pair of electrons to form a chemical bond. Compare acceptor (def. 3).
adj.
4. of or pertaining to the biological tissue of a donor: donor organ.
5. indicating, pertaining to, or for a giver of a donation, esp. a biological donation: a donor card; donor records.
[1400–50; late Middle English donour < Anglo-French (Old French doneur) < Latin dōnātor=dōnā(re) (see donation) + -tor -tor]
do′nor•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.donor - person who makes a gift of propertydonor - person who makes a gift of property
benefactor, helper - a person who helps people or institutions (especially with financial help)
abnegator - one who gives up or relinquishes or renounces something
almsgiver - a person who gives alms
Indian giver - an offensive term for someone who asks you to return a present he has given you
altruist, philanthropist - someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-being
settlor, trustor - (law) a person who creates a trust by giving real or personal property in trust to a trustee for the benefit of a beneficiary; a person who gives such property is said to settle it on the trustee
contributor, subscriber - someone who contributes (or promises to contribute) a sum of money
subsidiser, subsidizer - someone who assists or supports by giving a subsidy
tipper - a person who leaves a tip; "a generous tipper"
2.donor - (medicine) someone who gives blood or tissue or an organ to be used in another person (the host)
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
benefactor, helper - a person who helps people or institutions (especially with financial help)
blood donor - someone who gives blood to be used for transfusions
organ donor - someone from whom an organ is taken for transplantation

donor

donor

noun
A person who gives to a charity or cause:
Translations
مَانِحمُتَبَرِّع
dárce
donor=-donor
luovuttaja
donator
adományozódonor
-gjafi; gefandi
ドナー
기증자
darca
givare
ผู้บริจาค
bağışçıverici
người hiến nội tạng/máu

donor

[ˈdəʊnəʳ]
A. Ndonante mf
B. CPD donor card Ncarnet m de donante
donor organ Nórgano m donado

donor

[ˈdəʊnər]
n
[blood, organ] → donneur/euse m/f
(to charity) [money] → donateur/trice m/f
modif
[egg, sperm, organ] → de donneur/euse
[country, community, agency] → donateur/tricedonor card ncarte f de donneur d'organes

donor

n (Med, to charity) → Spender(in) m(f)

donor

[ˈdəʊnəʳ] n (gen, Med) → donatore/trice

donate

(dəˈneit) , ((American) ˈdouneit) verb
to give to a fund etc. He donated $100 to the fund.
doˈnation noun
a gift of money or goods to a fund or collection. All donations are welcome.
donor (ˈdounə) noun
a giver of a gift or of a part of the body used to replace a diseased part of someone else's body. The new piano in the hall is the gift of an anonymous donor; a kidney donor; a blood donor.

donor

مَانِح dárce donor Spender δωρητής donante luovuttaja donneur donator donatore ドナー 기증자 donor donor dawca doador донор givare ผู้บริจาค verici người hiến nội tạng/máu 捐献者

do·nor

n. donante, donador; persona contribuyente;
___ cardtarjeta de ___.

donor

adj de donante; — semen semen m de donante; n donante mf; living — donante vivo; organ — donante de órganos; universal — donante universal
References in periodicals archive ?
9) This trend is also consistent for cadaveric donor nephrectomies, where previously these were performed entirely by urology; however, our recent data now shows that 61.
As noted in part II, Beard, Jackson, Kaserman, and Kim demonstrate that increases in cadaveric donors in the United States reduce living donation, with a long-run offset of approximately forty percent.
With increasing demand for liver transplants and for reduction of wait-list mortality rates, the available donor pool has been expanded by the advent of the split-liver transplant technique from cadaveric donors and lobar (right or left) grafts from living related donors in addition to whole liver transplants.
5% were negative to willingness of becoming a cadaveric donor of organs and tissues (OR 0.
A recent proposed solution is to use HIV-positive cadaveric donor kidneys for transplantation into HIV-infected recipients.
3] were collected from the cadaveric donor eye obtained within 2 h of death, aged 8-85 yr (n=20, 10-denuded membrane and 10- denuded membrane + 3T3 feeder layer).
ANNA and members of the transplant community are unable to know with certainty if financial incentives increase the number of cadaveric donors or if such incentives will act as a deterrent to donation.
Although the Web sites and paired exchange programs focus on recruiting live donors, efforts also are being made to in crease the number of cadaveric donors.
The Web sites and paired exchange programs focus on recruiting live donors, but efforts are being made to increase the pool of cadaveric donors.
In contrast, survival of both living and cadaveric donor grafts rose just 6% per year among 11- to 17-year-olds.
In response, more marginal cadaveric donor organs are being accepted for transplantation.
The wait for a cadaveric donor kidney can be several years.