cadaver

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ca·dav·er

 (kə-dăv′ər)
n.
A dead body, especially one intended for dissection.

[Middle English, from Latin cadāver, from cadere, to fall, die; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

ca·dav′er·ic (-ər-ĭk) adj.

cadaver

(kəˈdeɪvə; -ˈdɑːv-)
n
1. (Medicine) med a corpse
2. (Anatomy) med a corpse
[C16: from Latin, from cadere to fall]
caˈdaveric adj

ca•dav•er

(kəˈdæv ər)

n.
a dead body, esp. a human body to be dissected; corpse.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin: corpse; akin to cadere to fall, perish (see decay, chance)]
ca•dav′er•ic, adj.
syn: See body.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cadaver - the dead body of a human beingcadaver - the dead body of a human being; "the cadaver was intended for dissection"; "the end of the police search was the discovery of a corpse"; "the murderer confessed that he threw the stiff in the river"; "honor comes to bless the turf that wraps their clay"
dead body, body - a natural object consisting of a dead animal or person; "they found the body in the lake"
cremains - the remains of a dead body after cremation

cadaver

noun
The physical frame of a dead person or animal:
Slang: stiff.
Translations
cadàver
dög
lavonasnegyvėlis
cadavru
mŕtvola
kadaver

cadaver

[kəˈdeɪvəʳ] N (esp US) → cadáver m

cadaver

[kəˈdævər] n (= corpse) → cadavre m

cadaver

nKadaver m; (of humans)Leiche f

cadaver

[kəˈdeɪvəʳ] n (Med) → cadavere m

ca·dav·er

n. cadáver.

cadaver

n cadáver m
References in periodicals archive ?
The distance between the origins of the celiac trunk and the superior mesenteric artery was measured in 76 cadavers from the inferior contour of the celiac trunk up to the superior contour of the superior mesenteric artery and in case of doubt regarding the common origin of these structures, the aorta was opened to allow better visualization.
In the decades before the hormone could be engineered, hGH was harvested from the pituitary glands of human cadavers.
Within 10 years, nearly two-thirds of kidneys transplanted from brain-dead donors or cadavers fail, defined as a decline in blood-filtering capacity to a point at which the person needs dialysis.
Imagine a whole book on human cadavers and you'd never conceive of all the fascinating elements she explores in this well-received book (included in numerous "best of 2003" lists).
Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach W.
Deukmejian is leading a UC task force that will investigate allegations that cadavers donated to the university's Willed Body Program were sold for a profit by two employees.
With honesty and openness, these students wrote about their experiences and their relationships to their cadavers, or as one student wrote, her "own really live dead body.
The Swedish Board of Agriculture is giving pounds 175,000 to three companies developing the method in which cadavers and animal by-products are incinerated without the usual step of first grinding them into meal.
Using a second-hand electric pump as a "heart" and red food coloring-from a grocery store as "blood," neurosurgeons at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences at Little Rock have breathed new life into laboratory cadavers.
Bone tissue derived from cadavers has been linked to an increased risk of disease transmission.
This narrative contains some startling assertions: that the Mongol army hurled plague-infected cadavers into the besieged Crimean city of Caffa, thereby transmitting the disease to the inhabitants; and that fleeing survivors of the siege spread plague from Caffa to the Mediterranean Basin.
Since it opened in March, the exhibition titled Body Worlds has come under critical and physical attack for displaying 25 cadavers in various poses.