Caddo

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Cad·do

 (kăd′ō)
n. pl. Caddo or Cad·dos
1. A member of a Native American confederacy composed of numerous small tribes formerly inhabiting the Red River area of Louisiana, Arkansas, and eastern Texas and now located in central Oklahoma.
2. The Caddoan language of the Caddo.

[French, from Caddo kaduhdā·čuʔ, a major tribe of the Caddo confederacy.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Cad•do

(ˈkæd oʊ)

n., pl. -dos, (esp. collectively) -do.
1. a member of any of several American Indian peoples formerly located in Arkansas, Louisiana, and E Texas, and now living in Oklahoma.
2. the Caddoan language of the Caddo.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Caddo - a group of Plains Indians formerly living in what is now North and South Dakota and Nebraska and Kansas and Arkansas and Louisiana and Oklahoma and Texas
Buffalo Indian, Plains Indian - a member of one of the tribes of American Indians who lived a nomadic life following the buffalo in the Great Plains of North America
Aricara, Arikara - a member of the Caddo people who formerly lived in the Dakotas west of the Missouri river
Eyeish - a member of the Caddo people of northeastern Texas
Kichai - a member of a Caddo people formerly living in north central Texas
Pawnee - a member of the Pawnee nation formerly living in Nebraska and Kansas but now largely in Oklahoma
Wichita - a member of the Caddo people formerly living between Kansas and central Texas
2.Caddo - a family of North American Indian languages spoken widely in the Midwest by the Caddo
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Aricara, Arikara - the Caddoan language spoken by the Arikara
Pawnee - the Caddoan language spoken by the Pawnee
Wichita - the Caddoan language spoken by the Wichita
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
'From the "Caddo Gazette," of the 12th inst., we learn the frightful death of Colonel Robert Potter.
This article is organized around several key moments in which the Caddos shared a sun account that made it into the written records.
The information he gathered resulted in almost twenty authored or coauthored publications about Caddoan tribes, though only two of these concerned the Caddos proper.
This is valid only if we ignore European diseases frequently introduced to Caddos prior to direct contact.
Economic opportunities in the fur, gun, and horse trade brought Caddos into larger communities, eventually based around trade centers or forts, while some population dispersion resulted from a continuing need to expand fur trapping territories.
For instance, several times each year the Caddo people gather to dance.
I once conducted a consultation with Bobby Gonzalez and Lyman Kinoute of the Caddo Tribe of Oklahoma.