cadmium

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cad·mi·um

 (kăd′mē-əm)
n. Symbol Cd
A soft, bluish-white metallic element occurring primarily in zinc, copper, and lead ores, that is easily cut with a knife and is used in nickel-cadmium storage batteries, rustproof electroplating, nuclear reactor shields, solders, and in low-friction, fatigue-resistant alloys. Atomic number 48; atomic weight 112.41; melting point 321.1°C; boiling point 767°C; specific gravity 8.65; valence 2. See Periodic Table.

[Latin cadmīa, calamine (the ore of zinc from which cadmium was first extracted as an impurity) (from Greek kadmeia (gē), Theban (earth), from Kadmos, Cadmus; see Cadmus) + -ium.]

cad′mic (-mĭk) adj.

cadmium

(ˈkædmɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a malleable ductile toxic bluish-white metallic element that occurs in association with zinc ores. It is used in electroplating, alloys, and as a neutron absorber in the control of nuclear fission. Symbol: Cd; atomic no: 48; atomic wt: 112.411; valency: 2; relative density: 8.65; melting pt: 321.1°C; boiling pt: 767°C
[C19: from New Latin, from Latin cadmīa zinc ore, calamine, referring to the fact that both calamine and cadmium are found in the ore]

cad•mi•um

(ˈkæd mi əm)

n.
a white, ductile, divalent metallic element resembling tin, used in plating and in making certain alloys. Symbol: Cd; at. wt.: 112.41; at. no.: 48; sp. gr.: 8.6 at 20°C.
[< German Kadmium (1817) < Latin cadm(īa) zinc oxide]
cad′mic, adj.

cad·mi·um

(kăd′mē-əm)
Symbol Cd A rare, bluish-white metallic element that occurs mainly in small amounts in zinc ores. It is soft and easily cut with a knife. Cadmium is plated onto other metals and alloys to prevent corrosion, and it is used to make rechargeable batteries and nuclear reactors. Atomic number 48. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cadmium - a soft bluish-white ductile malleable toxic bivalent metallic elementcadmium - a soft bluish-white ductile malleable toxic bivalent metallic element; occurs in association with zinc ores
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
calamine, hemimorphite - a white mineral; a common ore of zinc
Translations
кадмий
kadmium
kadmium
kaadmium
kadmium
kadmij
kadmium
kadmín
カドミウム
cadmium
kadmis
cadmium
kadm
cadmiu
kadmium
kadmij
kadmium

cadmium

[ˈkædmɪəm] Ncadmio m

cadmium

[ˈkædmiəm] ncadmium m

cadmium

nKadmium nt, → Cadmium nt

cadmium

n cadmio
References in periodicals archive ?
Control mice received water alone and LDC-exposed mice received drinking water that dissolved 100 nM cadmium chloride (Sigma Aldrich Inc.
Stock solution (1000 ppm) of Cd was prepared in de-ionized water by using analytical grade cadmium chloride (CdCl2.
Effect of sub-lethal dose of cadmium chloride on biochemical profile and catalase activity in fresh water fish Oreochromis niloticus.
Significant alterations were observed after the treatment of high and low dose of cadmium chloride injected to Larus argentatus.
To study the protective effect of antioxidants 3 days after seeding the salts of heavy metals (lead diacetate, cadmium chloride, cobalt chloride and ammonium molybdate), protectors (carnosine, mexidol, EDTA and N-acetyl cysteine) were added in different concentrations (8 wells per group).
Genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride and azadirachtin treated singly and in combination in fish.
All kits for biochemical analysis and Cadmium chloride (Cd Cl2 99% pure) were purchased from Biodiagnostic Co.
Cadmium chloride does not cause significant damages in the testes at a low dose of less than 3 mg/kg; however, it induces mild apoptosis of germ cells and damage to blood-testis barrier (BTB) (12, 13).
Up until now, the drawback of using cadmium telluride was that it needed to be activated by cadmium chloride, which is very expensive and also toxic.
According to University of Liverpool researchers, cadmium chloride, which is a highly toxic soluble compound used in making solar panels, requires elaborate safety measures to protect workers during manufacture, but it can be replaced it with magnesium chloride, which is extracted from seawater and is already used in products such as tofu, bath salts and for de-icing roads.