Caesarism


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Cae·sar·ism

 (sē′zə-rĭz′əm)
n.
Military or imperial dictatorship; political authoritarianism.

Cae′sar·ist n.
Cae′sar·is′tic adj.

Caesarism

(ˈsiːzəˌrɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an autocratic system of government. See also Bonapartism
ˈCaesarist n
ˌCaesarˈistic adj

Cae•sar•ism

(ˈsi zəˌrɪz əm)

n.
absolute government; imperialism.
[1595–1605]
Cae′sar•ist, n. adj.

Caesarism

the characteristics shown by a dictatorship or imperial authority. — Caesarist, n.
See also: Politics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Caesarism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)Caesarism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the prior consensus among Nigerians to embrace democracy and to electrocute the servant hood of caesarism is in a mirage.
He does not seek this -- he has three young children -- but does not summarily spurn the idea of offering temperate voters a choice of something other than a choice between bossy progressivism and populist Caesarism. Or he could become the first non-Republican the Grand Rapids area has sent to Congress since 1974.
Spengler, in his Decline of the West, argued that the decline phase of civilization reaches its nadir with the emergence of political Caesarism, the cash nexus in economics, and the appearance of large and powerful cities.
at 1413; see also Sven Eliaeson, Constitutional Caesarism: Weber's Politics in Their German Context, in THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO WEBER 131, 134-36 (Stephen Turner ed., 2000).
In normal times he would be just an efficient and successful executive, but in this revolutionary epoch, Caesarism is always at the door.'
(122.) The much-discussed crisis of representation, also called a "crisis of representative politics" or "crisis of representative democracy," was analyzed by Antonio Gramsci as the condition in which established political parties lose an organic link to their constituencies, generating crises of authority and introducing the possibility of what he called "Caesarism." See ANTONIO GRAMSCI, SELECTIONS FROM THE PRISON NOTEBOOKS 210, 219 (Quintin Hoare & Geoffrey Nowell Smith eds., 2005).
Its ideology is Caesarism, even as its reality is criminal marginality" (Buried Caesars, 197-98).
Under Caesarism neither state nor Church is free, for in relation to both Caesar's will or caprice is the law.
Democracy, for the thinkers of this way of thinking, is a concealed plutocracy which, according to Spengler, inevitable ends in Caesarism: "The mighty ones of the future may possess the earth as their private property--for the great political form of the Culture is irremediably in ruin--but it matters not, for, formless and limitless as their power may be, it has a task.
"France's Fifth Republic at Fifty: Plebiscitarian Caesarism from Descartes to Rousseau." Journal des Economistes et des Etudes Humaines.
Kurz fait de Jaures un theoricien du << welfare state >> avant l'heure (138), toujours favorable a une voie pacifique et progressive : << Reformism had staved off, for the present, the threat of a new and powerful reactionary force, a conglomeration of << Caesarism >>, clericalism, militarism, anti-Semitism, and nationalism.