Cahokia

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Ca·ho·ki·a

 (kə-hō′kē-ə)
A village of southwest Illinois, a suburb of St. Louis, Missouri. It is located on the site of a large Mississippian settlement (c. 800-1350) with numerous extant earthworks.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Presenting date from the Grossmann site (11S1131), a Cahokian settlement that was excavated in its entirety, Alt argues that it was a Cahokian administrative center where processes such as hybridity intertwined with ritual and politics.
"Water, Serpents, and the Underworld: An Exploration into Cahokian Symbolism." Galloway 45-92.
From Cahokian civilization through industrialization, Illinois' history is vast, varied, and integral to understanding core themes in American history.
Europeans take retrospective authority to define ancient Indigenous knowledge within the congruence paradigm, such as the possibility of Cahokian fiefdoms (O'Brien 1989).
By utilizing a broad time scale, Chappell is seeking to portray the humanization of the Cahokian landscape as successive civilizations have given it form and meaning.
Contemporaneous with the Cahokian mound builders in 1492, whaling peoples on the Northwest coast, nomadic tribes in the interior, cliff dwellers in the Southwest, and numerous other nations dwelled in these lands.
(14) They are clearly within the Cahokian sphere of influence or periphery, the site of the largest earthwork north of Mexico and a town more populous than London a thousand years ago.