Cain


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Cain

 (kān)
In the Bible, the eldest son of Adam and Eve, who murdered his brother Abel out of jealousy and was condemned to be a fugitive.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cain

(keɪn) or

kain

n
(Historical Terms) history (in Scotland and Ireland) payment in kind, usually farm produce paid as rent
[C12: from Scottish Gaelic cāin rent, perhaps ultimately from Late Latin canōn tribute (see canon); compare Middle Irish cāin law]

Cain

(keɪn)
n
1. (Biography) the first son of Adam and Eve, who killed his brother Abel (Genesis 4:1–16)
2. raise Cain
a. to cause a commotion
b. to react or protest heatedly
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cain

(keɪn)

n.
the first son of Adam and Eve, who murdered his brother Abel. Gen. 4.
Idioms:
raise Cain, to behave boisterously or violently; make a disturbance.
Cain•it′ic, adj.

Cain

(keɪn)
James M., 1892–1977, U.S. novelist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cain - (Old Testament) Cain and Abel were the first children of Adam and Eve born after the Fall of Man; Cain killed Abel out of jealousy and was exiled by God
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Cain

[keɪn] NCaín
to raise Cainarmar la gorda, protestar enérgicamente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Cain

nKain m; to raise Cain (inf: = be noisy) → Radau machen (inf), → lärmen; (= protest)Krach schlagen (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Cain

[keɪn] nCaino
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Cain's envy was the more vile and malignant, towards his brother Abel, because when his sacrifice was better accepted, there was no body to look on.
Within a hundred years after Adam left Eden, the guide probably gave the usual general flourish with his hand and said: "Place where the animals were named, ladies and gentlemen; place where the tree of the forbidden fruit stood; exact spot where Adam and Eve first met; and here, ladies and gentlemen, adorned and hallowed by the names and addresses of three generations of tourists, we have the crumbling remains of Cain's altar--fine old ruin!" Then, no doubt, he taxed them a shekel apiece and let them go.
"I incline to Cain's heresy," he used to say quaintly: "I let my brother go to the devil in his own way." In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of downgoing men.
Then the old man cried and grieved, and said he was a murderer and the mark of Cain was on him, and he had disgraced his family and was going to be found out and hung.
Every time he got money he got drunk; and every time he got drunk he raised Cain around town; and every time he raised Cain he got jailed.
An alarm Crow Indians Their appearance Mode of approach Their vengeful errand Their curiosity Hostility between the Crows and Blackfeet Loving conduct of the Crows Laramie's Fork First navigation of the Nebraska Great elevation of the country Rarity of the atmosphere Its effect on the wood-work of wagons Black Hills Their wild and broken scenery Indian dogs Crow trophies Sterile and dreary country Banks of the Sweet Water Buffalo hunting Adventure of Tom Cain the Irish cook
And only tears can heal: And the crimson stain that was of Cain
I seen old Flint in the corner there, behind you; as plain as print, I seen him; and if I get the horrors, I'm a man that has lived rough, and I'll raise Cain. Your doctor hisself said one glass wouldn't hurt me.
Cry "Murder!" in the market-place, and each Will turn upon his neighbor anxious eyes That ask:--"Art thou the man?" We hunted Cain, Some centuries ago, across the world, That bred the fear our own misdeeds maintain To-day.
Could she mix with the people, or visit the scenes, familiar to the experience of men (in fact and in fiction), who had traced the homicide to his hiding-place, and had marked him among his harmless fellow-creatures with the brand of Cain? No!
He did it so energetically and thoroughly that the poor Worm was cast into the depths of remorseful despair, and went to bed that evening feeling that he was an outcast from among men, and bore the mark of Cain upon his brow.
One board had written upon it, "I am blind," another, "I am deaf," another, "I am dumb," and the fourth, "Pity the lame one." But although all these troubles written upon the boards seemed so grievous, the four stout fellows sat around feasting as merrily as though Cain's wife had never opened the pottle that held misfortunes and let them forth like a cloud of flies to pester us.