Calabar bean


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Cal·a·bar bean

 (kăl′ə-bär)
n.
The poisonous seed of a tropical western African woody vine (Physostigma venenosum) in the pea family, the source of physostigmine.

[After Calabar, a town of southeast Nigeria.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Calabar bean

(ˌkæləˈbɑː; ˈkæləˌbɑː)
n
1. (Plants) the dark brown very poisonous seed of a leguminous woody climbing plant, Physostigma venenosum, of tropical Africa, used as a source of the drug physostigmine
2. (Pharmacology) the dark brown very poisonous seed of a leguminous woody climbing plant, Physostigma venenosum, of tropical Africa, used as a source of the drug physostigmine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cal′abar bean`


n.
the poisonous seed of an African climbing plant, Physostigma venenosum, of the legume family, the active principle of which is physostigmine.
[1875–80; after Calabar]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calabar bean - dark brown highly poisonous seed of the calabar-bean vine; source of physostigmine and used in native witchcraft
calabar-bean vine, Physostigma venenosum - tropical African woody vine yielding calabar beans
bean - any of various seeds or fruits that are beans or resemble beans
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A drawback is that the plants providing these drugs (galantamine from snowdrops or daffodils, and rivastigmine from the Calabar bean) are highly toxic, which means side effects such as nausea are a problem.
The main clue to his fate came when a lab report showed his intestine contained traces of the African calabar bean, a powerful poison used by adherents of voodoo.
Pal, a physiologist in Vienna, was performing experiments on paralysed dogs to study the effects on peristalsis of physostigmine, a derivative of the Calabar bean (1).