Achilles tendon

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Achilles tendon

n.
The large tendon connecting the heel bone to the calf muscles of the leg.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Achilles tendon

n
(Anatomy) the fibrous cord that connects the muscles of the calf to the heelbone
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Achil′les

(or Achil′les') ten′don,


n.
the tendon joining the calf muscles to the heel bone.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

A·chil·les tendon

(ə-kĭl′ēz)
A large tendon at the back of the leg connecting the calf muscles with the heel bone. The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Achilles tendon - a large tendon that runs from the heel to the calfAchilles tendon - a large tendon that runs from the heel to the calf
sinew, tendon - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachment
calf, sura - the muscular back part of the shank
heel - the back part of the human foot
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
tendon d’Achille

Achilles tendon

n (Anat) → tendine m di Achille
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

A·chil·les tendon

n. tendón de Aquiles, tendón mayor que se une a los músculos posteriores de la pierna y se inserta en el talón del pie; ___ reflex / reflejo plantar que ocurre al golpear el talón de Aquiles.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
5 By what common name is the calcaneal tendon, the thickest and strongest in the human body, known?
The suture remained beneath the common calcaneal tendon and was passed beneath the medial metatarsal vein and secured to itself in a circumferential pattern.
When pain is long lasting pain, or is chronic with ambulation, consider nerve entrapment, fracture, cyst or plantar calcaneal tendon tear.
The accessory soleus muscle usually arises from the soleal line of the tibia [34] and it inserts in one of five common patterns onto the calcaneal tendon or calcaneus [13].
The mode of insertion of plantaris tendon frequently varies and it may take either of the following: a) Soft tissue between gastrocnemius and soleus, b) Medial border of calcaneal tendon at its insertion, d) Bursa between the calcaneal tendon and calcaneus, e) Fibrofatty tissue of the calcaneal tendon, f) Plantar aponeurosis, Daseler.
In addition, the SN can be injured during surgery of varicosed small saphenous vein (SSV) (Mondelli et al, 1997; Kerver et al, 2012) and repair of calcaneal tendon rupture (Molloy & Wood, 2009).
A 25-gauge 1.5 inch standard needle is guided under real-time ultrasound guidance to the insertion of the calcaneal tendon and specifically underneath/anterior to any identified enthesophyte and in very close proximity to calcification.
The Achilles tendon or Common Calcaneal Tendon (CCT) is the largest in the body and is vulnerable to physical stress due to its limited blood supply and superficial location.
Classifying calcaneal tendon injury according to MRI findings.
Students presented on a variety of topics including kinematics and kinetics of various exercises, use of anthropometric calculations for weightlifters, isokinetics of shoulder exercises, exercise effect and loading for people with low back pain, kinematics of stroke gait, ground reaction forces of running (human and equine), mathematical modeling approaches to reaching and walking, tissue biomechanics of the calcaneal tendon and patellar tendon.
(13.) Carden DG: Rupture of the calcaneal tendon: the early and late management.