caldera

(redirected from Caldera volcano)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Caldera volcano: Composite volcano

cal·de·ra

 (kăl-dâr′ə, -dîr′ə, käl-)
n.
A large crater formed by volcanic explosion or by collapse of a volcanic cone.

[Spanish, cauldron, caldera, from Late Latin caldāria; see cauldron.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

caldera

(kælˈdɛərə; ˈkɔːldərə)
n
(Physical Geography) a large basin-shaped crater at the top of a volcano, formed by the collapse or explosion of the cone. See cirque
[C19: from Spanish Caldera (literally: cauldron), name of a crater in the Canary Islands]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cal•de•ra

(kælˈdɛr ə, kɔl-)

n., pl. -ras.
a large, basinlike depression resulting from the explosion or collapse of the center of a volcano.
[1860–65; < Sp Caldera literally, cauldron < Late Latin caldāria]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caldera - a large crater caused by the violent explosion of a volcano that collapses into a depressioncaldera - a large crater caused by the violent explosion of a volcano that collapses into a depression
crater, volcanic crater - a bowl-shaped geological formation at the top of a volcano
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

caldera

[kælˈdɛərə] n (Geol) → caldera
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The person "probably lived in the city but was not killed by the eruption" of the Loma Caldera volcano, archaeologist Michelle Toledo said.
Despite its desert location some 160 kilometers northwest of Las Vegas, the 400-meter-high dormant caldera volcano ranks as one of the most studied pieces of geology on earth.
Then, the eruption of the Loma Caldera volcano less than half a mile away marked its end.