Caledonia


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Cal·e·do·ni·a

 (kăl′ĭ-dō′nē-ə, -dōn′yə)
Roman Britain north of the Antonine Wall, which stretched from the Firth of Forth to the Firth of Clyde. Today the term is used as a poetic appellation for all of Scotland.

Cal′e·do′ni·an adj. & n.

Caledonia

(ˌkælɪˈdəʊnɪə)
n
(Placename) the Roman name for Scotland
Usage: Caledonia is now used poetically and, sometimes, humorously

Cal•e•do•ni•a

(ˌkæl ɪˈdoʊ ni ə)

n.
Chiefly Literary. Scotland.
Cal`e•do′ni•an, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Caledonia - the geographical area (in Roman times) to the north of the Antonine Wall; now a poetic name for Scotland
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
Translations

Caledonia

[ˌkæləˈdəʊnɪə] NCaledonia f

Caledonia

nKaledonien nt
References in classic literature ?
The name of Robin Hood, if duly conjured with, should raise a spirit as soon as that of Rob Roy; and the patriots of England deserve no less their renown in our modern circles, than the Bruces and Wallaces of Caledonia.
Then this new island will be joined later on to the neighboring groups, and a fifth continent will stretch from New Zealand and New Caledonia, and from thence to the Marquesas.
Louis had been found in the hands of some savages of Louisiade and New Caledonia.
He first cast anchor at Botany Bay, visited the Friendly Isles, New Caledonia, then directed his course towards Santa Cruz, and put into Namouka, one of the Hapai group.
The Northwest Company, acting feebly and partially upon the suggestions of its former agent, Sir Alexander Mackenzie, had pushed one or two advanced trading posts across the Rocky Mountains, into a tract of country visited by that enterprising traveller, and since named New Caledonia.
Astor should he be able to carry his scheme into effect; but they anticipated a monopoly of the trade beyond the mountains by their establishments in New Caledonia, and were loth to share it with an individual who had already proved a formidable competitor in the Atlantic trade.
Being able to reinforce and supply it amply by sea, he would push his interior posts in every direction up the rivers and along the coast; supplying the natives at a lower rate, and thus gradually obliging the Northwest Company to give up the competition, relinquish New Caledonia, and retire to the other side of the mountains.
Sometimes he was a fisherman, but he was always and everywhere a determined hunter, and that was nothing remarkable for a son of Caledonia, who had known some little climbing among the Highland mountains.
Encircling barrier-reefs are of all sizes, from three miles to no less than forty-four miles in diameter; and that which fronts one side, and encircles both ends, of New Caledonia, is 400 miles long.
In the case of the barrier-reef of New Caledonia, which extends for 150 miles beyond the northern point of the islands, in the same straight line with which it fronts the west coast, it is hardly possible to believe that a bank of sediment could thus have been straightly deposited in front of a lofty island, and so far beyond its termination in the open sea.
If, instead of an island, we had taken the shore of a continent fringed with reefs, and had imagined it to have subsided, a great straight barrier, like that of Australia or New Caledonia, separated from the land by a wide and deep channel, would evidently have been the result.
The great barrier of New Caledonia is thus imperfect and broken in many parts; hence, after long subsidence, this great reef would not produce one great atoll 400 miles in length, but a chain or archipelago of atolls, of very nearly the same dimension with those in the Maldiva archipelago.