Call note

the note naturally used by the male bird to call the female. It is artificially applied by birdcatchers as a decoy.

See also: Call

References in periodicals archive ?
A single call note was of 0.19+-0.02 seconds duration with an inter-note interval of 1.76+-0.59 seconds (Fig.
He states that, out of season, most birds communicate with others what is called the "call note" which Janet must have heard and mistook for full song.
See the call note history and work performed, for a customer, on one screen
Still, the Wicks Lane warbler did seem to have most of the characteristics of a Siberian "tristis" bird, even down to a rather melancholy call note, quite unlike the typical "hoo'et" of our normal collybita race of chiffchaff.
Today, oil spills, power lines and communication towers remain threats to birds, but you can help protect them by taking a "featured action" each month, from learning to identify bird habitats to distinguishing their varied songs and call notes. (Visit nationalgeographic.org/projects/ year-of-the-bird for details).
Some paintings are of instantly-recognisable local views, some are what I call notes from the riverbank, others graphically show the elegant twists of the river as it winds its way across the carse from its rising in the Trossachs.
Prospecting data, including decisionmaker contact information as well as call notes and activities, all go into the CRM database for analysis and lead nurturing.
The file could include the perpetrator's name, mail and email addresses, phone numbers, website addresses, regulatory registration numbers, a timeline of events, police reports, call notes and recent credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
Species with 2 categories tend to use first-category songs early in the breeding season prior to the arrival of the females, while second-category songs tend to be delivered in low-light conditions before sunrise after pairing and often along with chip-like call notes. Second-category songs are also common in territorial encounters.
UNC Health Care (unchealthcare.org) is using natural language processing from IBM (ibm.com) to sift through unstructured data, such as doctors' notes, registration forms, discharge summaries and phone call notes, pairing it with structured data and using it to target high-risk patients and design prevention programs for them.
Thankfully, it was nothing more than any other newspaperman brings home from a night on the sauce: what I call Notes from a Journalist's Junket.