Callimachus


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Related to Callimachus: Apollonius of Rhodes, Theocritus

Cal·lim·a·chus 1

 (kə-lĭm′ə-kəs) Fifth century bc.
Greek sculptor who reputedly designed the Corinthian column.

Cal·lim·a·chus 2

 (kə-lĭm′ə-kəs) Third century bc.
Greek poet and scholar whose extant works include 64 epigrams and a catalog of the library at Alexandria.

Callimachus

(kəˈlɪməkəs)
n
1. (Biography) late 5th century bc, Greek sculptor, reputed to have invented the Corinthian capital
2. (Biography) ?305–?240 bc, Greek poet of the Alexandrian School; author of hymns and epigrams
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
1728; "The Remains of Hesiod translated from the Greek into English Verse", by Charles Abraham Elton; "The Works of Hesiod, Callimachus, and Theognis", by the Rev.
As his sources for Hymnus in Noctem, Chapman mentions only Greek poets: Hesiod, Aratus, Lycophron, Callimachus, Homer and the Orphic hymns, and uses Plato and Natalis Comes' Mythologiae once to explain specific assumptions implied in his inventions.
Callimachus pours out a wealth of information, but there is no unifying idea, no intellectual objective, and no educational program, only a keen sense for the colorful variety of knowledge in all of its forms, which he incorporates into his poetry without the kind of hierarchical arrangement that would mean taking a position on its truth or utility.
I learned to write from authors like Callimachus and Meleager, including the Roman elegists (Catullus and Propertius, but less so Tibullus), and the indispensable Martial and Ausonius.
Greek poet Callimachus technically sophisticated, and illustrates his point by providing a literal English translation to show how effectively Callimachus arranges his words.
In addition to the echo motive representing the different poets responding to each other, he says, the entire story of the boy Hylas being kidnapped by nymphs, though written in different periods and literary contexts, all adhere to the poetic ideas of Callimachus.
141), which is a hapax in Callimachus (In Iovem, v.
345-71), who principally examines allusions to Callimachus in Martial's epigrams through the intermediate source of Catullus--what he describes as "window allusions".
He recites the poem "Heraclitus" by William Johnson Cory, and the cabinet minister claims to be able to say it in Greek, no doubt the version by Callimachus translated by Cory (O&G, Penguin, 129-31).
His literary patronage is especially associated with the poets Callimachus and Theocritus, who, in turn, had great influence on later Greek and Latin authors.
Componam epithalamium, sicut Battiades Callimachus.
The fried balls of dough covered in honey were referred to as "honey tokens'' by the poet Callimachus, whose reference is the earliest mention of any kind of pastry in European literature, she said.