Gallipoli

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Gal·lip·o·li

 (gə-lĭp′ə-lē)
A narrow peninsula of northwest Turkey between the Dardanelles and the Gulf of Saros. It was the scene of heavy fighting (1915) between Allied and Turkish forces in World War I.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Gallipoli

(ɡəˈlɪpəlɪ)
n
1. (Placename) a peninsula in NW Turkey, between the Dardanelles and the Gulf of Saros: scene of a costly but unsuccessful Allied campaign in 1915
2. (Placename) a port in NW Turkey, at the entrance to the Sea of Marmara: historically important for its strategic position. Pop: 22 000 (latest est)
Turkish name: Gelibolu
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholars who think that the philosophers of Callipolis in the Republic are reluctant to give up the joys of philosophical contemplation do not necessarily take an austere dualist view of Plato.
(1978), "Comedy in Callipolis: Animal Imagery in the Republic", The American Political Science Review, Vol.
1 -- Guess what is common among the intriguing words La Solara, Trifecta Verdure, Callipolis, Wave Edenia and Earth Copia?
A third, Love's Triumph through Callipolis, assigns a labyrinth dance to its anti-masquers.
At the end of Book 7, after recommending the expulsion of all who are age ten or older and thus founding Callipolis "most quickly and easily" (514a),(11) Socrates concludes that he and his interlocutors have discovered the city and the man they sought.
However, Love's Triumph through Callipolis (1631) restored torchbearing to the symbolism of love and desire in the guise of Cupids:
(9) See my Comedy in Callipolis: Animal Imagery in Plato's Republic, 72 Am.
Callipolis produces these "hardened men, products of coercion" because the regime cannot count on nature to furnish an adequate supply of philosophical rulers.
Clearly, the designer, Inigo Jones, was getting above himself, and Ben Jonson, who consistently objected to his attempts to control all aspects of the masques, protested strongly at Jones's name being placed alongside (rather than above) his own on the title-page of Love's Triumph through Callipolis. Despite Jonson's sophistication, he was clearly a forerunner of Hollywood's Louis B.
Resonances can be found in Orgel, 59: "All representations,' wrote Ben Jonson, 'especially those of this nature in court, public spectacles, either have been or ought to be the mirrors of man's life'" (Loves Triumph through Callipolis, lines 1-3).